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Michael Lydon, “Theodore Dreiser and George Eliot: Contrast & Coincidence”

 

 

Michael Lydon, ‘Theodore Dreiser & George Eliot; Contrast and Coicidence’

 

 

 

Posted here (above) as a downloadable PDF file document is an original essay by Dreiser scholar Michael Lydon:

 

“Theodore Dreiser and George Eliot: Contrast & Coincidence”

 

 

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See also:

 

Michael Lydon publishes “On Reading Theodore Dreiser’s The Bulwark” and “Theodore Dreiser, Anna Tatum, & The Bulwark: The Making of a Masterpiece”

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2018/06/30/michael-lydon-publishes-on-reading-theodore-dreisers-the-bulwark-and-theodore-dreiser-anna-tatum-the-bulwark-the-making-of-a-masterpiece/

 

Michael Lydon, “Justice to Theodore Dreiser”

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/michael-lydon-justice-to-theodore-dreiser/

Michael Lydon publishes “On Reading Theodore Dreiser’s The Bulwark” and “Theodore Dreiser, Anna Tatum, & The Bulwark: The Making of a Masterpiece”

 

 

 

Dreiser enthusiast and scholar Michael Lydon is the author of two new books on Dreiser that have not had wide distribution, but which are well worth reading:

 

On Reading Theodore Dreiser’s The Bulwark

Patrick Press, 2011

 

 

Theodore Dreiser, Anna Tatum, & The Bulwark: The Making of a Masterpiece

Franklin Street Press, 2017

 

 

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On Reading Theodore Dreiser’s The Bulwark is essentially an appréciation of Dreiser’s final novel.

 

Theodore Dreiser, Anna Tatum, and The Bulwark: The Making of a Masterpiece explores new aspects behind the composition of Dreiser’s final novel, which Dreiser worked on for years before it was finally published posthumously. Key findings of Lydon include material on Anna Tatum and her family, providing for a deeper understanding of the Quaker sources underlying the novel.

Anna Tatum was a brilliant young woman from a Quaker family in New Jersey who was one of Dreiser’s many mistresses. She told Dreiser stories about growing up in a Quaker home and community, and these inspired him to write The Bulwark. Lydon’s book length essay combines a sensitive analysis of the novel’s literary excellence and a narrative of the tangled story of Dreiser’s and Tatum’s on again, off again affair. Using newly discovered source material, it delves into how Tatum’s Quaker roots influenced the creation of The Bulwark.

 

 

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The books are available for purchase by going to the publisher’s website

 

franklinstpress.com

 

and scrolling down through the “bookstore” link (at bottom of page) and, then, scrolling through the “bookstore” (hit “next page” to the desired books on Dreiser). Use “Add to Cart” button to purchase.

Payment is by PayPal. Buyers not using PayPal can click on the “contact” button at the top of the page and purchase the book by phone or mail, enclosing a check.

 

 

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See also:

 

Michael Lydon, “Justice to Theodore Dreiser”

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/michael-lydon-justice-to-theodore-dreiser/

“foul tactics”

 

 

‘Dreiser Defends Norris on Power’ – NY Times 1-2-1931

 

‘Dreiser Attacks Power Trust,’Chicago Daily Tribune 7-2-1931

 

‘Foul Tactics’ – NY Times 7-3-1931

 

 

Posted here (above) as downloadable PDF files are two news stories and an editorial focusing on controversy that Theodore Dreiser was involved in in 1931. As is well known, Dreiser did less writing after the publication of his only bestseller, An American Tragedy, and became an outspoken critic of the capitalist system. The articles posted above focus on a controversy which occurred in July 1931 when Dreiser attacked monopolistic practices of utility companies.

 

 

DREISER DEFENDS NORRIS ON POWER

The New York Times

July 2, 1931

 

 

DREISER ATTACKS “POWER TRUST” AND TELLS WHY

Chicago Daily Tribune

July 2, 1931

 

 

FOUL TACTICS (editorial)

The New York Times

July 3, 1931

 

 

The New York Times editorial in whimsical fashion segues from a discussion of Dreiser’s attack on utilities to a billboard advertising the forthcoming film An American Tragedy and Dreiser’s dissatisfaction with the film, which he tried to prevent from being shown.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

    June 2018

Roger W. Smith, letter to editor; August 1, 1990

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I am posting this letter of mine to the Editor of “News at 10,” the alumni newsletter of the New York University Department of Journalism because it speaks, from the perspective of journalism, about Dreiser as I perceived him and his works at an early stage of my acquaintance with him.

 

— Roger W. Smith

    June 2018

 

 

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See also my post:

 

“mistaken attribution (Dreiser credited with early news story he didn’t write)”

 

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/mistaken-attribution-by-t-d-nostwich-dreiser-credited-with-early-news-story-he-didnt-write/

 

Note that I now doubt that Dreiser wrote the January 12-13, 1894 St. Louis Republic stories about the hanging of Sam Welsor.

a Theodore Dreiser chronology, by Roger W. Smith

 

 

Dreiser chronology

 

 

See downloadable Word document, above.

 

 

 

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The purpose of this timeline of Theodore Dreiser’s life, career, and publication history is to highlight key dates and events, including milestones in his life and also including turning points and incidents that shed light on Dreiser’s development — professionally and as a writer — and the development of his views.

Seemingly less important accounts or reports (some of which proved to be inaccurate), the occasional passing mention or fleeting glimpse gleaned from a newspaper account have been included to give verisimilitude to this chronology, and to show the expectations held by the public at a given time about Dreiser’s output and productions of his works, as well as false starts Dreiser made.

A key emphasis has been placed in this chronology on the publication history of Dreiser’s works, both in the U.S. and other counties, to show how far and wide Dreiser’s influence and reputation have spread.

Also included in this chronology are works of scholarship that represent key junctures in Dreiser studies.

It is hoped that the chronology posted here, besides listing facts, will give a feeling for the zigs and zags of Dreiser’s life; its ups and downs; and how events shaped the once callow reporter into a literary lion given more and more at the end of his life to pronouncements and less to actual literary output.

 

Note: An excellent, more concise chronology, compiled by Thomas P. Riggio, which fills in many gaps in this one, can be found in The Library of American edition of Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

Edward H. Smith, “Dreiser — After Twenty Years”

 

 

‘Dreiser after Twenty Years’- The Bookman, March 1921

 

 

Posted here (above) as a PDF file is an interesting article about Theodore Dreiser by Edward H. Smith:

 

“Dreiser — After Twenty Years”

The Bookman; a Review of Books and Life 53.1 (March 1921)

 

Smith knew Dreiser personally and includes many details derived from his acquaintance with Dreiser as well as his assessments of the man and author.

 

–Roger W. Smith

  May 2018

 

source materials re Frederick Rotzler (Theodore Dreiser’s “captain”)

 

 

Thomas P. Riggio has published an article:

“Oh Captain, My Captain: Dreiser and the Chaplain of Madison Square” in

Studies in American Naturalism, vol. 11, no. 2 (Winter 2016)

in which, for the first time, the identity of “the captain,” a figure in Chapter XLV of Sister Carrie (“Curious Shifts of the Poor”), was identified, proving that the figure of “the captain,” a chaplain who aids homeless men by soliciting donations from the public for their shelter, did indeed have a real-life model.

Almost all of the primary source material in Professor Riggio’s article came from me and not from his research, as I have explained in my post:

“a scholarly rip-off; the real identity of Theodore Dreiser’s chaplain”

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2018/05/18/a-scholarly-rip-off-the-real-identity-of-theodore-dreisers-chaplain/

I have posted here much of the primary material I have collected in the form of downloadable PDF files. The material has already been used (without attribution) by Professor Riggio. Some Dreiser scholars may find it useful to have access to the full text of the articles at a future date.

 

 

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The articles posted below concern the real life “captain” in Dreiser’s novel: Frederick Rotzler (b. circa 1859).

Some of the articles feature Rotzler. In others, he is mentioned in passing. They describe charitable (or what might be described as missionary) activities the same as those described by Dreiser.

The earliest articles describe Rotzler as having served as a chaplain to National Guard units.

A few facts about Rotzler (other than the charitable activities described by Dreiser) emerge:

Rotzler tried to remain independent and nonsectarian. He was not an ordained minister. His denomination, such as it was, was Pentecostal.

He had been doing his charitable work in Worth Square, soliciting donations for homeless men, beginning in 1892. Sister Carrie was published in 1900. (Dreiser came to Manhattan for the first time in the summer of 1894 and settled there permanently in late 1894. So, he came not long after Rotzler had begun his charitable work.)

Rotzler does not appear to have been the proselytizing type. Rather, he was someone who conceived of his mission as helping the poor and downtrodden without seeking personal glory or credit.

Besides seeking to find beds for the homeless, he would visit prisons and hospitals during daytime hours.

 

 

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imageedit_3_5018844377 (2).jpg

The Worth Monument is located in Worth Square, at Broadway and 24th Street in Manhattan, adjacent to Madison Square Park. The monument marks the grave of General William Jenkins Worth (1794– 1849), who served in the War of 1812 and the Mexican War. Worth Street in Lower Manhattan is named after him. (Photograph by Roger W. Smith.)

 

 

imageedit_1_6437603324.jpg

Present day Worth Square, where Frederick Rotzler did his charitable work. (Photograph by Roger W. Smith.)

 

 

 

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1 – ‘The Fourth in Camp’ – NY Times 7-5-1889

 

2 – ‘In the Eleventh District’ – NY Times 4-2-1890

 

3 – ‘Eight Court-Martialed’ – NY Times 7-31-1890

 

4 – ‘National Guard Notes’ – NY Times 11-19-1893

 

5 – ‘A Preacher Unordained’ – NY Times 11-26-1893

 

6 – ‘National Guard Notes’ – NY Times 12-31-1893

 

7 – ‘Met at the Altar to Pray’ – NY Times 3-15-1894

 

8 – ‘Father Lambert Welcomed’ – NY Times 5-23-1894

 

9 – ‘The Gospel Through the Megaphone’ – The World (NY) 9-6-1896

 

10 – ‘Lodging for the Homeless’ – NY Times 12-20-1897

 

11 – ‘Dewey Arch Column Ablaze’ – NY Times 5-14-1900

 

12 – ‘Shelters A Little Army’ – NY Times 11-18-1901

 

13 – ‘Church Services To-morrow’ – NY Times 3-20-1909

 

14 – ‘Religious Notices’ – NY Times 6-4-1910

 

15 – ‘Tending His Flock by Night’ – The Continent 12-11-1913

 

16 – ‘Church Services To-morrow’ – NY Times 1-3-1914

 

17 ‘Putting His Congregation to Sleep’ – Literary Digest 1-16-1914

 

 

SOURCES:

 

“The Fourth in Camp”

New York Times

July 5, 1889

 

“In the Eleventh District”

New York Times

April 2, 1890

 

“Eight Court-Martialed”

New York Times

July 31, 1890

 

“National Guard Notes

New York Times

November 19, 1893

 

“A Preacher Unordained”

New York Times

November 26, 1893

 

“National Guard Notes”

New York Times

December 31, 1893

 

“Met at the Altar to Pray”

New York Times

March 15, 1894

 

“Father Lambert Welcomed”

New York Times

March 23, 1894

 

“The Gospel Through the Megaphone”

The World (NY)

September 6, 1896

 

“Lodging for the Homeless”

New York Times

December 20, 1897

 

“Dewey Arch Column Ablaze”

New York Times article

May 14, 1900

 

“Shelters a Little Army”

New York Times

November 18, 1901

 

“Church Services To-morrow”

New York Times

March 20, 1909

 

“Religious Notices”

New York Times

June 4, 1910

 

“Tending His Flock by Night”

The Continent

December 11, 1913

 

 

“Church Services To-morrow”

New York Times

January 3, 1914

 

“Putting His Congregation to Sleep”

Literary Digest

January 16, 1914

 

 

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Theodore Dreiser, ‘The Man’s Life is Dedicated to Preaching’ – Wash Post 7-1-1906

 

I have also posted here (above) as a PDF file an article by Theodore Dreiser:

“This Man’s Life Is Dedicated to Preaching to the World the Gospel of Human Brotherhood”

The Washington Post

July 1, 1906

which was originally published in Success magazine.

The article faithfully describes the charitable activities of “the captain” in Worth Square.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   May 2018