Dreiser bibliography, 1990

 

 

Aaron, Daniel. “Brother Theodore.” New Republic 203 (12 November 1990): 34-37, 40. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman.

Abramson, Doris. ” ‘The New Path’: Nineteenth Century American Women Playwrights.” In Modern American Drama: The Female Canon ed. Ed. June Schlueter. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP; London: Associated U Presses, 1990. 45. Notes that in his article “American Women as Successful Playwrights,” Success 2 (17 June): 485-86 (C99-33), Dreiser “liberally plagiarized” from an 1898 article by Esther Singleton in Ev’ry Month. 

Adams, Carol Ann. “Women and Biology in Four Novels by Theodore Dreiser.” Master’s thesis, Georgetown U, 1990. iii + 83 pp.

Allen, Bruce. “Dreiser, Depicted in Great Detail.” Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. USA Today 2 Nov. 1990: D4.

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. “The Search for Ev’ry Month: An Update.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Spring): 31-34. Documents the fifty-year search for Ev’ry Month under Dreiser’s editorship and provides an inventory of library locations for the 21 available numbers.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Bigelow, Blair F. Review of Journalism: Vol. 1. American Literary Realism 23.1 (Fall 1990): 84-85.

Blume, Donald Thomas. “The Hitchcock-Dreiser Editor-Author Relationship.” Master’s thesis, U of Delaware, 1990. iii + 126 pp.

Campbell, Donna M. “Repudiating the `Age of the Carved Cherry-Stones’: The Naturalists’ Reaction Against Women’s Local Color Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Kansas, 1990, 431 pp. DAI 51 (1991): 3741A. Includes Dreiser among naturalist writers who, because of both their literary credo and their gender, rebelled against the domination of late nineteenth-century fiction by local color writers.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

De La Perriere, Earleen. “Sister Carrie, Sisters in Sable Skin, and Gestures of Exclusion.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall 1990): 19-26. Places Carrie in the context of black women living in her era and culture and argues that although she is a passive character who never entirely overcame social exclusion, she was nonetheless much more privileged than these contemporaries, who often had neither the support of men nor good luck. (Abridgement of a paper delivered at the 1990 “Working Girls” Conference at SUNY Brockport.)
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Delbanco, Andrew. “Searching for Sex and Power.” Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman. Boston Globe 30 Sept. 1990: B43.

Dow, Georganne H. “Sisters under the Skin.” Master’s thesis, U of Maine, 1990. ii +101 pp. Analyzes woman characters in the works of Emile Zola, Thomas Hardy, Theodor Fontane, and Dreiser.

“Dresser, Paul.” The Faber Companion to 20th-Century Popular Music. By Phil Hardy and Dave Laing. London: Faber and Faber, 1990. 223-24. 

Elias, Robert H. “Dreiser’s Long Foreground.” Review 12 (1990): 179-185. Review of Theodore Dreiser’s “Heard in the Corridors”: Articles and Related Writings, edited by T. D. Nostwich; Theodore Dreiser: Journalism, Volume One: Newspaper Writings, 1892-1895, edited by T. D. Nostwich; and Selected Magazine Articles of Theodore Dreiser: Life and Art in the American 1890s, edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani.

Enniss, Stephen. “Tragic ‘Journey’ of Dreiser Shared with Compassion.” Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Special Issue. 14 Oct. 1990: N10.

Fabre, Michel. Richard Wright: Books and Writers. Jackson: UP of Mississippi, 1990, pp. 41-42. Lists titles of works by Dreiser owned by Wright and quotes passages from Wright’s writings that mention Dreiser and/or his works.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Fecher, Charles. “The Dreiser Paradox.” Chicago Tribune Books, 16 September 1990, p. 1. Review of Richarde Lingeman’s two-volume biography of Dreiser (1986 and 1990).

Fluck, Winfried. “Modelle der Relation: American Studies, Theodore Dreiser’s Roman An American Tragedy und dessen Verfilmungen.” Amerikastudien/American Studies 35.2 (1990): 189-202. Uses An American Tragedy and its film versions to discuss how theoretical models of “relation” and their cultural “pre-texts” are mutually limiting.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Gerber, Philip L. “The Doings at Brockport.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall): 1-13. Describes the behind-the-scenes preparations made by Gerber (guest editor of this issue of Dreiser Studies) for “Working Girls: Sister Carrie at Ninety,” a conference held October 25-26, including papers, films, and a discussion which led to the Dreiser Society’s formation.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Gogol, Miriam. “Dreiser’s Search for a `Religion of Life’: A Psychoanalytic Reading,” Dreiser Studies 21 (Spring): 21-30. Connects Dreiser’s abandonment of The Bulwark in 1914 and return to it at the end of his life with his effort to be reconciled with his dead father and, thus, with God as “father.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Gogol, Miriam. “The `Genius’: Dreiser’s Testament to Convention.” CLA Journal 33: 402-14. Claims Witla’s suffering for rebelling against the norms of society and his discovery that “he can will himself to do anything he chooses” indicate that, contrary to the views of most critics, The “Genius” does not present an argument against middle-class conventions, and it “only seems naturalistic.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “Dreiser’s Romantic Tendencies.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall): 40-45. Compares the 1900 first edition and the 1981 Pennsylvania Edition of Sister Carrie to demonstrate that the former emphasizes Carrie’s romantic individualism while the latter restores the original naturalism of Dreiser’s manuscript. (Abridgement of a paper delivered at the 1990 “Working Girls” Conference at SUNY Brockport)
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Hamilton, Ian. Writers in Hollywood, 1915-1951. New York: Harper and Row, 1990: 53-56. Traces Dreiser’s battle with Paramount over the filming of An American Tragedy.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Hart, Jeffrey. “Dreiser hailed as writer of the city; Novelist caught aesthetic power of urban scene” (The Lost Word). Washington Times, 7 May 1990: E7. A defense of Dreiser the writer which begins by assessing criticisms by Malcolm Cowley, H. L. Mencken, and Lionel Trilling. Finds Dreiser’s ideas or philosophical opinions to be “incoherent” and his style occasionally “embarrassing,” but finds that Trilling in particular did not do justice to Dreiser’s power as a novelist.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Howe, Irving. “Dreiser: The Springs of Desire.” In Selected Writings, 1950-1990. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990, pp. 167-78. Reprint of Howe’s afterword to the NAL edition of An American Tragedy (1964).

Hussman, Lawrence E., Jr. “Dreiser’s (Bad) Luck with Hollywood.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall 1990): 14-16. Provides a transcript of introductions to An American Tragedy (1931), A Place in the Sun (1951), and Carrie (1952) (three films shown at the SUNY Brockport conference on Dreiser), in which Hussman discusses censorship, the quality of the adaptations, and the movies’ treatment of women.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Kazin, Alfred. “Awkward but Immortal.” New York Times Book Review, 30 September, 1990, pp. 1, 40-41. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman.

Kinsaul, Lucia A. “The Letters of Grant Richards To Theodore Dreiser: 1905-1914.” Master’s thesis, Florida State U, 1990. xxix + 113 pp.

Kurth, Peter. American Cassandra: The Life of Dorothy Thompson. Boston: Little, Brown, 1990. 122, 142-44, 171-72.

Lehan, Richard. “The Theoretical Limits of the New Historicism.” New Literary History 21 (1990): 533-53. Illustrates weaknesses in Walter Benn Michaels’ reading of Sister Carrie (1987.34) in the course of pointing out problems in the assumptions of new historicism and the representational school of criticism.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Levenson, J C. “The Sadness of Sister Carrie.” Morphologies of Faith: Essays in Religion and Culture in Honor of Nathan A. Scott, Jr. American Academy of Religion Studies in Religion. Ed. Mary Gerhart and Anthony C. Yu. Atlanta, GA: Scholars P, 1990: 291-307. 

Limon, John. “After the Revolutions: Brown and Dreiser, Poe and Pynchon, Hawthorne and Mailer.” In The Place of Fiction in the Time of Science: A Disciplinary History of American Writing. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1990, pp. 160-89. Pairs Dreiser and Charles Brockden Brown in a chapter which concludes that, though Spencer and Darwin apparently influenced the Dreiser of Sister Carrie, his novel in actuality “fends off . . . the model of scientific history.” Drawing evidence from Drouet, who does not evolve, and Carrie, who moves but does not progress, argues that the novel “connects Dreiser to a literary tradition that itself does not evolve.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Lingeman, Richard. “Another American Tragedy.” New York Times 22 January 1990: 15. Points out parallels between An American Tragedy and the Charles Stuart murder case in Boston.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Lingeman, Richard. Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1990. Volume II of a two-volume biography. 

McKelly, James Crisley. “True Wests: Twentieth Century Portraits of the Artist as a Young American.” Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana U, 1990. xiii + 184 pp. DAI 52 (1991): 919A. Includes Eugene Witla of The “Genius” in its survey of protagonists who answer the call made by Walt Whitman in his 1881 essay “Poetry of the Future” for a new kind of American artist.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37; Indiana University library, online catalogue

Meigen, Johannes A. W. “Self and Other Or Self Versus Other? The Perception of Identity and Social Relatedness in The Awakening, A Hazard of New Fortunes and Sister Carrie.” Master’s thesis, U of Massachusetts, 1990. 150 pp.

Mencken, H. L. The H. L. Mencken Baby Book: Comprising the Contents of H. L. Mencken’s What You Ought To Know About Your Baby with Commentaries. Ed. Howard Markel and Frank A. Oski. Philadelphia: Hanley and Belfus, 1990. 3-6, 12-15, 18-19, 23. Discusses Dreiser’s involvement with Mencken in a series of baby care articles for the Delineator. See also Markel, Howard. “What You Ought to Know About What You Ought to Know About Your Baby.” Menckeniana, no. 111 (Fall 1989): 7-13.

Michaels, Walter Benn. “The Contracted Heart.” New Literary History 21.3 (1990): 495-531. Shows how historical changes in the position of women in relation to consumption and the right to privacy are reflected in Sister Carrie and in works by Kate Chopin and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Miller, Terry. Greenwich Village and How It Got That Way. New York: Crown, 1990. 99-100, 136, 141, 184, 206-7. 

Mitgang, Herbert. “An American Writer and the Passions in His Art.” New York Times, 10 October 1990: C20. Review of second volume of Lingeman’s biography of Dreiser. Notes that it is “especially revealing in its research into ‘An American Tragedy.’ ”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Morozkina, E.A. Roman T. Draizera “Oplot” i evropeiskii pozitivizm. (Ob evoliutsii filosofsko-esteticheskikh vzgliadov T. Draizera). Traditsii i vzaimodeistvia v zarubezhnoi literature XIX-XX vekov. [T. Dreiser’s Novel ”The Bulwark” and European Positivism (on the Evolution of the Philosophical-Aesthetic Views of T. Dreiser). Traditions and Interactions of Foreign Literature in the 19th-20th Centuries]. Perm, 1990, pp. 99-107 Морозкина Е.А. Роман Т.Драйзера “Оплот” и европейский позитивизм. (Об эволюции философско-эстетических взглядов Т.Драйзера) // Традиции и взаимодействия в зарубежной литературе XIХ-ХХ веков. Пермь, 1990, с.99-107. 

Morse, Jonathan. Word by Word: The Language of Memory. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1990. 204-205. Briefly discusses the use by Dreiser (as well as other writers) of the “rhetoric of the regress of perception.” 

Mukherjee, Arun P. “Sister Carrie at Ninety: An Indian Response.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall): 27-39. Argues that the canon in both India and Canada and critical discourse in the United States have excluded Dreiser and other realists who wrote about the inequities of race, class, and gender and tried to inspire their readers to change society. (Transcript of a paper delivered at the 1990 “Working Girls” Conference at SUNY Brockport.)
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Mukherjee, Arun. “The man who knew why women sinned.” Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey: Volume II, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada) 17 Nov. 1990: C19. 

Murayama, Kiyohiko. “Doraisâ to Rôdo-Kaikyu [Dreiser and the Laboring Classes],” in Kaikyû Ishiki to Amerika Shakai [Class Consciousness in American Society]. Edited by Kôichi Ogawa and Katayama Atsushi. Tokyo: Bokutaku-sha, pp. 261-78. In Japanese.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Nathan, George Jean. A George Jean Nathan Reader. Ed. A. L. Lazarus. Rutherford, NJ.: Fairleigh Dickinson UP; London: Associated U Presses, 1990. 160-70, 217-19, 223-25. Reprints (pp. 160-70) Nathan’s sketch “Theodore Dreiser” in The Intimate Notebooks of George Jean Nathan. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1938. Also reprints (pp. 217-19, 223-25) four Dreiser letters to Nathan, all of them previously published in Letters of Theodore Dreiser (1959), ed. Robert H. Elias. 

Nelson, Bertil C. “William James’ Concept of the Self and the Fictive Psychology of Theodore Dreiser in Sister Carrie.” Essays in Arts and Sciences 19 (May 1990): 44-64. Discusses the psychology Dreiser uses to interpret Hurstwood, Drouet, and Carrie in relation to William James’ explanation of the material Me, the social Me and the spiritual Me in his concept of the self.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

“New Light on Dreiser: A Summary of Session Four.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Fall 1990): 17-18. Abstracts papers presented by James L.W. West III, Nancy Warner Barrineau, and Leonard Cassuto at the 1990 “Working Girls” Conference at SUNY Brockport.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

“Noted by the Editor.” Antioch Review 48.3 (1990): 404. Notes publication of Penguin Classic edition of Jennie Gerhardt and briefly compares it to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles.

Nozaki, Takashi. “Doraisâ, Shidô” [Dreiser, Theodore], in Zô Ho Kaitei Shinchô Sekai Bungaku Jiten [The Shinchô Dictionary of World Literature]. Rev. and enlg. ed. Tokyo: Shinchô-sha, pp. 727-28. In Japanese.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Nye, David E. “Theodore Dreiser’s Subversion of the Novel of Social Reform.” Studies in Modern Fiction: Presented to Bent Nordhjem on His 70th Birthday, 31 May 1990. Ed. Eric Jacobson, Jørgen Erik Nielsen, Bruce Clunies Ross, and James Stewart. Copenhagen: Faculty of Humanities, U of Copenhagen, 1990. 33-48. Examines how Dreiser’s The Financier and The Titan “radically violated reader expectations” by subverting the reform novel to which middle class readers were accustomed.
Source: MLA International Bibliography, cited in Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Ostwalt, Conrad E., Jr. After Eden: The Secularization of American Space in the Fiction of Willa Cather and Theodore Dreiser. Lewisburg, Penn: Bucknell UP, 1990. Publication, revised, of the author’s dissertaton (Duke U, 1987).

Oura, Akio. “Amerika no Higeki no Seiritu [The Making of An American Tragedy] (3),” Journal of the Faculty of Literature, Chûô University (Japan) 66: 55-73. In Japanese.

Patterson, Martha H. “Emerging from the Tableau: The Female Heroine’s Construction Within and Resistance of the Male Gaze in Sister Carrie, The House of Mirth and The Wings of the Dove.” Master’s thesis, U of Iowa, 1990. ii + 62 pp.

Ray, Kevin. “Dreiser, A Cumbersome But Powerful Writer.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch 30 December 1990: 5F. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. 

Review of Theodore Dreiser An American Journey: 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. Indianapolis News 6 October 1990. Sec. E, pg. 8. 

Riggio, Thomas P. “Dreiser, Theodore [Herman Albert] (1871-1945).” The Dictionary of American Immigration History. Ed. Francesco Cordasco. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1990. 184-85. 

Riggio, Thomas P. 1990. Review of Life and Art in the American 1890s. Resources For American Literary Study 17.2 (1990): 318-21.

Rusch, Frederic E. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1988.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Spring 1990): 35-41.

Signer, Robert. “The exuberant Theodore Dreiser: A writer who lived to write.” Chicago Sun-Times 23 September 1990. Review of Theodore Dreiser An American Journey: 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. 

Smith, Sid. ” ‘Sister Carrie’ is swept away by ambitious script.” Chicago Tribune 15 May 1990: 16. Reviews 1990 production of Sister Carrie by Touchstone Theatre in Chicago.

Smith, Wendy. Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1990, pp. 254-58 passim. Focuses on Lee Strasberg’s direction and problems with the set design in a discussion of the Group Theatre’s production of Case of Clyde Griffiths.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Spitler, Theresa Margaret. “The Dilemma of Superiority: The Genius Character in American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Pennsylvania, 1990, 299 pp. DAI 51 (1991): 4125A. Illustrates how American writers starting with James and Clemens struggled with the conflict between the genius and American society; concludes that later writers like Dreiser create protagonists whose naive expectations of social acceptance give way to unsuccessful attempts at retaliation
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Stenerson, Douglas C. “Mencken’s Efforts to Reshape Dreiser as Man and Artist.” Dreiser Studies 21 (Spring 1990): 2-20. Chronicles the degeneration of Mencken and Dreiser’s relationship between 1915 and 1926 and asserts it was caused primarily by Mencken’s repeated attempts to make Dreiser fit a mold of Mencken’s own making.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Szuberla, Guy. “Ladies, Gentlemen, Flirts, Mashers, Snoozers, and the Breaking of Etiquette’s Code.” Prospects: An Annual of American Cultural Studies 15 (1990): 169-96. Includes Carrie’s walks and her meeting with Drouet in Chapter 6 of Sister Carrie among the examples of the ways artists and authors at the turn of the century “recoded the conventions and gender roles that American culture, through its `street etiquette,’ had once decreed.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Takeda, Miyoko. “Henry David Thoreau to Theodore Dreiser-Genshô-Kai o Koete-[Henry David Thoreau and Theodore Dreiser-Beyond the Phenomenal World-],” Henri Sôrou Kyôkai Kaihô (Japan) 17 (1990): 11-16. In Japanese.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” The World Almanac Biographical Dictionary. By the editors of The World Almanac. New York: World Almanac Publications, 1990. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Volume 35. Detroit: Gale Research, 1990. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Writers and Philosophers: A sourcebook of philosophical influences on literature. By Edmund J. Thomas and Eugene G. Miller. New York: Greenwood, 1990. 

Trigg, Sally Day. “Theodore Dreiser and the Criminal Justice System in An American Tragedy,” Studies in the Novel 22.4 (winter 1990): 429-440. Illustrates how, in Book Three of An American Tragedy, Dreiser criticizes the American criminal justice system for the unfairness in its mechanisms and in the social forces intertwined with it, and “for the death penalty and the harrowing psychological torture of Death Row.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Vancil, David. “The Journey Completed.” Dreiser Studies 21.2 (1990): 46-47. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman. 

Wagner-Martin, Linda. The Modern American Novel 1914-1945: A Critical History. Twayne’s Critical History of the Novel Boston: Twayne, 1990, pp. 61-62 passim. Finds that An American Tragedy, “usually considered a text of the late naturalist movement, … becomes less naturalistic than it is modernist” when examined in relation to other novels of the 1920s. Notes that in the character of Roberta Alden Dreiser “proves that he knows and understands women characters, especially those trapped in poverty.”
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Watkins, Floyd C., John T. Hiers, and Mary Louise Weaks, eds. Talking with Robert Penn Warren. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1990.88, 194, 215, 244-46.

Weir, Sybil. “A Bacchante Invades the American Home: The Disappearance of the Sentimental Heroine, 1890-1910.” In American Literature, Culture, and Ideology: Essays in Memory of Henry Nash Smith. Ed. Beverly R. Voloshin. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 191-218. Briefly considers Dreiser in its discussion of the inversion of the sentimental heroine at the turn of the century. Argues that in Sister Carrie Dreiser “is most radical in his conception of the social aspirant when he suggests that women as well as men can seek material success without losing their moral credentials”; and that in Jennie Gerhardt sexual submission, the essence of true morality in women who lie “outside the social fabric of urban America,” is merely a variant of the self-sacrifice which the nineteenth century extolled as a sentimental virtue.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Weiss, Hedy. ” ‘Sister Carrie’ captures spirit of Dreiser’s America.” Chicago Sun-Times 3 May 1990, pg. 45. Review of production of play Sister Carrie adapted by Tom Creamer. 

West, James L. W. III. “Theodore Dreiser,” in Sixteen Modern American Authors. Vol. 2: A Survey of Research and Criticism Since 1972. Ed. Jackson R. Bryer. Durham: Duke UP, 1990, pp. 120-53. Updates Robert Elias’s bibliographical essay in Sixteen Modern American Authors, Ed. Jackson R. Bryer (New York: Norton, 1973) through 1985; includes a brief supplement for publications through 1988.
Source: Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Yardley, Jonathan. “Titan of American Realism.” Washington Post Book World, 30 September 1990, p. 3. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman. 

Zasurskii, Iasen Nikolaevich. Pisateli SShA. Kratkie tvorcheskie biografii. [USA writers. Short Biographies of Works], 2nd edition. Moscow, 1990. Засурский, Ясен Николаевич. Писатели США. Краткие творческие биографии. 2-е изд. Москва, 1990. 

selections re Dreiser from the diary of Elenaor Anderson

 

 

selections from The Diary of Eleanor Anderson

 

 

 

Posted above as a downloadable Word document:

“Selections from The Diary of Eleanor Anderson, 1933-1940,” compiled by Hilbert H. Campbell, The Sherwood Anderson Review, XXVI (winter 2001), pp. 10-11.

Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson was Sherwood Anderson’s third wife.

I wish to thank Sherwood Anderson scholar Claire Bruyère for calling my attention to this excerpt and providing me with a copy.

 

— Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen (Patges) Dreiser obituary

 

obituary , Mrs. Helen Esther Dreiser

New York Times, Saturday, September 24, 1955

Helen Dreiser was Theodore Dreise  r’s second wife. She was born Helen Esther Patges in 1984 in Oregon. Her first husband, who she married in Oregon, was Francis Dawson Richardson. She married Theodore Dreiser in the state of Washington in 1944.  She died at the home of her sister in Oregon on September 22, 1955.

 

 

Helen Dreiser obituary,  NY Times (from AP) 9-24-1955

music

 

 

 

 

 

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“On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away” (1897)

 

Composed by Dreiser’s brother Paul Dresser (1857-1906), “On the Banks of the Wabash” became the Indiana state song. Theodore Dreiser claimed to have written part of the lyrics himself. For a discussion of this, see On the Banks of the Wabash: The Life and Music of Paul Dresser by Clayton W. Henderson (Indiana Historical Society Press, 2003). See also “’On the Banks of the Wabash’: A Musical Whodunit” by Richard W. Dowell in Indiana Magazine of History 66 (June 1970) and “Collaborating on ‘The Banks of the Wabash’: A Brief History of an Interdisciplinary Debate, Some New Evidence, and a Reflexive Consideration of Turf and Ownership” by Carol S. Loranger and Dennis Loranger in Dreiser Studies 30.1 (1999).

 

 

 

 

“On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away”

(Verse)

Round my Indiana homestead wave the cornfields,
In the distance loom the woodlands clear and cool.
Oftentimes my thoughts revert to scenes of childhood,
Where I first received my lessons, nature’s school.
But one thing there is missing from the picture,
Without her face it seems so incomplete.
I long to see my mother in the doorway,
As she stood there years ago, her boy to greet.

(Chorus)

Oh, the moonlight’s fair tonight along the Wabash,
From the fields there comes the breath of newmown hay.
Through the sycamores the candle lights are gleaming,
On the banks of the Wabash, far away.

(Verse)

Many years have passed since I strolled by the river,
Arm in arm, with sweetheart Mary by my side,
It was there I tried to tell her that I loved her,
It was there I begged of her to be my bride.
Long years have passed since I strolled thro’ the churchyard.
She’s sleeping there, my angel, Mary dear,
I loved her, but she thought I didn’t mean it,
Still I’d give my future were she only here.

 

 

 

 

 

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“My Gal Sal; or, They Called Her Frivolous Sal” (1905)

 

Composed by Dreiser’s brother Paul Dresser, this song did not become a hit until after Paul Dresser’s death in 1906. The song is about Annie Brace (alias Sallie Walker), an Evansville, Indiana madam who was Paul Dresser’s paramour. “My Gal Sal” is also the title of a 1942 film produced by Twentieth Century-Fox that was based on Paul Dresser’s life and which draws loosely on Theodore Dreiser’s affectionate memoir “My Brother Paul” in his Twelve Men.

 

“My Gal Sal.” Composed by Paul Dresser. Performed by Joan Morris, mezzo; William Bolcom, piano. From the album “Moonlight Bay” (Albany Records, catalogue # TROY318). Used with permission of Albany Records.

 

 

“My Gal Sal; or, They Called Her Frivolous Sal”

 

Everything is over and I’m feeling bad
I lost the best pal that I ever had
‘Tis but a fortnight since she was here
Seems like she’s gone tho’, for twenty years
Oh, how I miss her, my old pal
Oh, how I’d kiss her, My Gal Sal
Face not so handsome, but eyes don’t you know
That shone just as bright as they did years ago.

They called her frivolous Sal
A peculiar sort of a gal
With a heart that was mellow
An all ’round good fellow, was my old pal
Your troubles, sorrow and care
She was always willing to share
A wild sort of devil, but dead on the level
Was My Gal Sal.

Brought her little dainties just afore she died
Promised she would meet me on the other side
Told her how I love her, she said, “I know Jim
Just do your best, leave the rest to Him.”

Gently I pressed her to my breast
Soon she would take her last, long rest
She looked at me and murmured, “Pal.”
And softly I whispered “Goodbye, Sal.”

 

 

Dreiser family genealogy

 

 

Attached are three genealogical reports on the Dreiser family that that have been generated using genealogy software. The reports are based on genealogical research by Roger W. Smith.

Each report is in Register format, a genealogical format introduced in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register which is widely used by genealogists. Such reports are designed to show descent from a common ancestor.

The reports posted here (see below) are in PDF format and are downloadable:

 

 

“descendants of Johann Paul Dreiser” (Dreiser’s father)

“descendants of Henry Schnepp” (Dreiser’s maternal grandfather)

“descendants of Theodore Dreiser”

 

 

descendants of Johann Paul Dreiser

 

descendants of Henry Schnepp

 

descendants of Theodore Dreiser

 

 

 

 

 

Tamie Dehler on the history of the Dreiser family, Terre Haute Tribune-Star

 

 

In 2013, Tamie Dehler, a journalist based in Terre Haute, Indiana with expertise in genealogy, published a series of six articles in the Terre Haute Tribune-Star about the genealogy of Theodore Dreiser and his family, including many facts hitherto undiscovered.

Ms. Dehler’s articles are concise, packed with information, fascinating, and very well researched. They are groundbreaking from a biographical standpoint.

I am of the belief that any one of the three Dreiser biographers since Robert Elias, Dreiser’s first biographer, would have been very pleased to have had these articles at hand. The articles reveal a great deal, for example, about Dreiser’s siblings, whom Dreiser biographers have found difficult to trace.

The articles, all published in the Terre Haute, are attached here in the form of a downloadable PDF file. They are as follows:

 

October 27, 2013
“GENEALOGY: Father of Dreiser brothers was Terre Haute spinner”

November 2, 2013
“GENEALOGY: Paul Jr. was the eldest of the Dreiser children”

November 9, 2013
“GENEALOGY: Dresser’s fall in 20th century from wealthy to bankrupt”

November 17, 2013
“GENEALOGY: A little about the lives of the non-famous Dreiser children”

November. 23, 2013
“GENEALOGY: Continuing to Look at records of Dreiser siblings”

November 30, 2013
“GENEALOGY: Theodore Dreiser born in 1871 in Terre Haute”

 

 

 

Dreiser family, Tribune Star

 

 

The articles are posted courtesy of the Tribune-Star Publishing Company, Terre Haute, Indiana.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

“George Ade Absolves Dreiser”

 

 

 

On September 7, 1926, the New York Herald Tribune printed a story concerning alleged plagiarism by Dreiser, including plagiarism in writing Sister Carrie whereby Dreiser lifted a story by George Ade.

Ade’s reply to these charges, the text of which follows below, was printed in the Herald Tribune of September 9, 1926: “George Ade Absolves Dreiser Of Lifting His ‘Swift Worker’ ”

 

— Roger W. Smith

 

 

*******************************************************************

 

 

You have asked if Theodore Dreiser in his novel ‘Sister Carrie’ incorporated in one of his early chapters part of a story which I had written for ‘The Chicago Record.’ Before I reply to your inquiry let it be understood that I am simply complying with your request. To get back. I am not stirring up any charge against Mr. Dreiser, not after all these years. Along about 1898 I wrote for ‘The Record’ a story in fable form called The Two Mandolin Players and the Willing Performer.

In that story I had a character shown as cousin Gus from St. Paul. He was of the type then known as a swift worker. Probably we would call him a sheik today, seeing that we have made such a tremendous advance in recent years. In my little story I detailed the tactics which would be employed by Gus if he spotted a good looker on the train between St. Paul and Chicago.

When the very large and important novel called Sister Carrie came out I read it, and I was much amused to discover that Theodore Dreiser had incorporated in a description of one of his important characters the word picture of Cousin Gus which I had outlined in my newspaper story and which later appeared in a volume called ‘Fables in Slang.’ It is true that for a few paragraphs Mr. Dreiser’s copy for the book tallied very closely with my copy for the little story. When I discovered the resemblance I was not horrified or indignant. I was simply flattered. It warmed me to discover that Mr. Dreiser has found my description suitable for the clothing of one of his characters. Many people came to me and called my attention to the fact that a portion of my little fable had been found imbedded in the very large novel of Mr. Dreiser.

I figured that he had read my fable was about like his character in the novel and that he absorbed the description and used it without any intent of taking something which belonged to someone else. Most certainly I do not accuse Mr. Dreiser of plagiarism even by implication or in a spirit of pleasantry. I have a genuine admiration for him. To me he is a very large and commanding figure in American letters. While some of us have been building chicken coops, or, possibly, bungalows, Mr. Dreiser has been erecting skyscrapers. He makes the three-decker novel look like a pamphlet. He is the only writer on our list who has the courage and the patience and the painstaking qualities of observation to get all of the one _____ [illegible word] into the story.

Theodore Dreiser was born in Indiana and the Hoosiers are very proud of him. I knew rather intimately his brother, Paul, who wrote many popular songs and one highly esteemed here at home, ‘The Banks of the Wabash.’ I was active in planning a memorial to Paul to be placed on the banks of the Wabash down near his old home. While we were planning the memorial I had some correspondence with Theodore Dreiser. I am rather sorry that some one has reminded the Herald Tribune, of which I an constant reader and regular subscriber, that Mr. Dreiser got into his novel something which I read like something written by one before his novel came out.

It all happened so many years ago. It seems to raise the absolutely preposterous suggestion that Mr. Dreiser needs help. Anybody who writes novels containing approximately one million words each doesn’t need any help from any one. As I said before, while most of our guild are at work on tiny structures which stay close to the ground, Mr. Dreiser is putting up skyscrapers. If, in building one of his massive structures he used a brick from my pile, goodness knows he was welcome to it and no questions were asked or will be asked. These are the facts in the case. Mr. Dreiser hasn’t hurt my feelings at any time. I don’t want to hurt his feelings now.

 

 

 

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See also:

“did Dreiser plagiarize in writing his first novel?”

posted on this site at

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2016/08/01/did-dreiser-plagiarize-in-writing-his-first-novel/