Dreiser bibliography, 1997

 

 

Amano, Kyoko. “The Influence of Horatio Alger on Theodore Dreiser’s Novels.” Master’s thesis, Indiana State U, 1997. v + 87 pp.

Amrane, Nadjia. “Anxiety in Dreiser’s Novels,” dissertation (doctorat d’Etat), U of Algiers, 1997. xi + 539 pp.

Bassis, Irina. “Crossing Cultures with Carrie Meeber and Theodore Dreiser.” Master’s thesis, Iowa State U, 1997. 82 pp.

Bassis, Irina. “Notable Elements in the Translation of Sister Carrie into Russian.” Dreiser Studies 28.1 (1997): 35-51.

Bellamy, John Stark II. “Dreiser Verbiage Litters Landscape.” Review of A Hoosier Holiday (A97.1). Plain Dealer (Cleveland) 13 July 1997. Books Section, pg. 11I.

Brinkley, Douglas. “A Chant of Middle America: Theodore Dreiser, A Hoosier Holiday, and the Birth of the Road Book.” Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 9.1 (1997): 4.

Brinkley, Douglas. Introduction. A Hoosier Holiday, by Theodore Dreiser. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1997.

Campbell, Donna M. “Dreiser, London, Crane, and the Iron Madonna.” Resisting Regionalism: Gender and Naturalism in American Fiction, 1885-1915. Athens, OH: Ohio UP, 1997. 109-45. Reprinted in American Naturalism. Ed. Harold Bloom. Bloom’s Period Studies. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2004. 299-337.

Casey, Roger N. Textual Vehicles: The Automobile in American Literature. General Studies in American Popular History and Culture. New York and London: Garland, 1997. 24-25, 28, 35. Quotes from A Hoosier Holiday to illustrate conceptions of travel (by automobile and train) in American literature. 

Claman, Elizabeth Monteith. “Refiguring Ill Repute: Representations of Prostitute Women in the United States (1880-1920) and France (1945-1977).” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Oregon, 1997. 432 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 4638A. Includes a discussion of “unruly women” in the works of Dreiser and David Graham Phillips.

Davies, Jude. Review of Dreiser’s Russian Diary, ed. Thomas P. Riggio and James L. W. West, III. Borderlines: Studies in American Culture (Centre for American Studies, University of Swansea) 4:2 (1997), 190-91. 

Delbanco, Andrew. “Lyrical Dreiser.” Required Reading: Why Our American Classics Matter Now. New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 1997. 133-54.

Donovan, Nancy McIlvaine. “American Tragedies: Representations of Crime and the Law in Twentieth Century Discourse.” Ph.D. dissertation, Miami U, 1997. 275 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 3920A. The opening chapter, “Dreiser’s Paradigm,” discusses the prototypical “American Tragedy” murder.

Elliott, Mary Josephine. ” ‘The Intelligence of a Nation’: Mark Twain, Willa Cather, and Theodore Dreiser in the Age of Andrew Carnegie.” Ph.D. dissertation, Boston College, 1997. ii + 280 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 4652A. Examines the ways in which Mark Twain, Willa Cather, and Dreiser were implicated in and responded to the cultural projects of Andrew Carnegie, the Pittsburgh steel baron. Chapter One examines Cather’s and Dreiser’s Pittsburgh journalism as their engagement with nationalism and patriotism serving Carnegie, George Westinghouse, and an evolving corporate state. Chapter Four argues that Dreiser’s Pittsburgh journalistic apprenticeship led him to associate sentimentalism and this feminized, corporate workforce with Carnegie’s cultural philanthropy and the emerging corporate class which Carnegie’s program empowered.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Epstein, Joseph. “Dreiser’s Great Good Girl”. IN Life Sentences: Literary Essays. New York: Norton, 1997. 308-21. Reprint of 93.11.

Ernst, Monty Lee. “Dubious Battles: Closure, Capitalism, and the Limitations of Form in Literary Naturalism.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Toledo, 1997. 179 pp. DAI 58 (1997): 1707A. “Beyond Form and History: Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Doctorow’s The Book of Daniel” (thesis chapter).

Gallert, Petra Martina. “UR-Texts and the Historiography of Knowledge: How Restored Versions of American Novels Have Fared in Cultural Discourse.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Delaware, 1997. x + 202 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 166A “Beginning in the 1960s, a number of problematic texts were restored as closely as possible to what textual scholarship could determine to be the author’s original intention. In the process, editorial theories were tested and refined.” Texts examined include Melville’s Billy Budd, Sailor; Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger manuscripts; Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and The Red Badge of Courage; and Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Gammel, Irene. “Dearest Wilding: Dreiser’s Sexual Rhetoric in Journals and Letters.” Excavatio 10 (1997): 21-33.

Gordeeva, Elena Ur’evna. T. Draizer i L. Tolstoi. Voprosy vzaimovliiania literatur. [T. Dreiser and L. Tolstoi. The questions of mutual influence of literatures]. N. Novgorod, 1997. pp. 81-85 Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. Т. Драйзер и Л. Толстой // Вопросы взаимовлияния литератур. Н.Новгород, 1997. С. 81-85 

Guest, David. Sentenced to Death: The American Novel and Capital Punishment. Jackson: U of Mississippi P, 1997.

Hadella PM. Review of Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism ed. Miriam Gogol. American Literary Realism 29.2 (winter 1997): 92-94. 

Hickey, Daniel Edward. “Suicidal Naturalism: Self-Murder in Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature.” Master’s thesis, The American U, 1997. 52 pp. MAI 40 (2002): 42. “Dreiser’s Sister Carrie: ‘What’s the use?’ ” (thesis chapter).

Hjartarson P. Review of Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederic Philip Grove, by Irene Gammel. English Studies in Canada 23.4 (1997): 461-63. 

Hussman, Lawrence E. “The World According to Timothy Titcomb: Putting Sister Carrie in Context.” Dreiser Studies 28.1 (1997): 25-34.

Itzkovitz, Daniel. “American Modernism, Race and the Rhetoric of ‘Jewish Difference,’ 1880-1940.” Ph.D. dissertation, Duke U, 1997. 237 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 4271A. Asserts that late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century developments in American writing were profoundly shaped by the struggle to locate and contain “Jewish difference.” Dreiser is one of ten writers whose works are examined.

Jessie, Angela Kay. “New Desdemonas: Societal Acting and Consumer Culture in Dreiser, Wharton, and Larsen.” Master’s thesis, U of Louisville, 1997. v + 79 pp. MAI 36 (1998): 47. Includes discussion of Sister Carrie.

Johnson, Brian A. “A Counsellor At Hand: Sister Carrie and Variable Narrative Confidence.” Master’s thesis, U of Oklahoma, 1997. v, 109 pp.

Karaganis, Joseph James. “American Literary Naturalism and the Modernist Turn.” Ph.D. dissertation, Duke U, 1997. 350 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 4272A. Focuses on three writers (William Carlos Williams, Dreiser, and William Faulkner) who provide the opportunity to consider, retrospectively, modernist investments in redemptive nationalism and cultural originality; the persistence of realist nationalist ambitions and their distortion in Dreiser’s late naturalism; and Faulkner’s belated turn towards literary naturalism.

Larsen, S.E. “Between Nowhere and Everywhere: Literature and the City.” Canadian Review of Comparative Literature 24.2 (1997): 219-34.

Lem, Ellyn Andrea. “Pioneers and Martyrs: Realism and the ‘Woman Question’ in Turn-of-the-Century American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, New York U, 1997. 259 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 3524A. “Maidens and Money: The Dynamics of Work for Women in Dreiser and Glasgow” (thesis chapter).

Li, Hsin-Ying. “Seeking the Center: The Provincials in the Novels of W.D. Howells, Theodore Dreiser, and Edith Wharton.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York at Buffalo, 1997.158 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 2654-55A.

Lingeman, Richard. “Dreiser does Russia.” Review of Dreiser’s Russian Diary (A96.2). Nation 264 (10 Feb 1997): 32-33.

Marín Madrazo Pilar. “Notas sobre el naturalismo.” Letras en el espejo: Ensayos de literatura americana comparada. Ed. María José Alvarez Maurin, Manuel Broncano, and José Luis Chamosa. León, Spain: Universidad de León; 1997. 145-54. Discusses Dreiser and Sister Carrie.

Marshall, Elizabeth. “Collecting Theodore Dreiser.” Firsts: The Book Collector’s Magazine 7.4 (1997): 42-50.

McGilligan, Patrick, and Paul Buhle. Tender Comrades: A Backstory of the Hollywood Blacklist. New York: St. Martin’s, 1997. 142-43. Contains interview with Hollywood screenwriter John Bright, who recalls a dinner in San Francisco among supporters of imprisoned labor activist Tom Mooney at which Dreiser and Lincoln Steffens were present and Dreiser met the actor James Cagney.

Middleton, Jo Ann. “Fiction: 1900 to the 1930s.” American Literary Scholarship: An Annual 1995. Ed. Gary Scharnhorst. Durham, Duke UP, 1997. 259-302. (Dreiser, Dos Passos, and James M. Cain pp. 282-85.)  

Moddelmog, William Evan. “Reconstituting Authority: American Fiction in the Province of the Law, 1880-1920.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Los Angeles, 1997, vii + 276 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 3133A.

Morozkina, Eugenia. “Dreiser and Schopenhauer: The Concept of ‘Desire.’” Dreiser Studies 28.2 (1997). 22-33.

Mulligan, Roark. “From Low-Cost Detachable Collars to American High Culture: Dreiser’s Rhetoric of Cloth.” English Language Notes 35.2 (1997): 64-69.

Mulligan, Roark. “Sister Carrie.” Identities and Issues in Literature. Salem Press, 1997.

Parker, Dorothy, “Words, Words, Words.” American Satire: An Anthology of Writings from Colonial Times to the Present. Ed. Nicholas Bakalar. New York: Meridian, 1997. 375-79. Reprint.

Prasad, Murari. “Gender and Culture in Sister Carrie.” Indian Journal of American Studies (Hyderabad, India) 27.1 (1997): 59-64.

Ravitz, Abe C. Imitations of Life: Fannie Hurst’s Gaslight Sonatas. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1997. 152-53, 155, 159-60 passim.

Riggio, Thomas P. “The Dream Life of Theodore Dreiser.” Dreiser Studies 28.2 (1997): 3-21.

Roberts, Ian F. “Thesis and (Ant)ithesis: Dreiser’s ‘McEwen of the Shining Slave Makers’ and the Game of Life.” Dreiser Studies 28.2 (1997): 34-43.

Robertson, Michael. “Journalism and the Making of Modern Literature: Theodore Dreiser and Ernest Hemingway.” Stephen Crane, Journalism, and the Making of Modern American Literature. New York: Columbia UP, 1997. 177-210.

Rudanko, Juhani. “Not Making a Choice in Dreiser: The Leadup to Hurstwood’s Theft in Sister Carrie.” Linguistic Analysis and Text Interpretation: Essays on the Bill of Rights and on Keats, Shakespeare, and Dreiser. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1997. 111-18.

Ruotolo, Cristina Lucia. “ReSounding Fictions: Music, Literature and Audience in Early Twentieth-Century America.” Ph.D. dissertation, Yale U, 1997. 239 pp. DAI 58 (1998): 1284A.

Russo, Maria. “Dreiser’s Holiday.” Lingua Franca: The Review of Academic Life 7.2 (February 1997): 23-24. Discusses Dreiser’s A Hoosier Holiday and its forthcoming reissue by Indiana University Press. 

Salska, Agnieszka “The uses of the female protagonist in the American novel of the 1890s: Crane’s Maggie, Dreiser’s Carrie, Chopin’s Edna Pontellier.” Acta Universitatis Lodziensis: Folia Litteraria Anglica (Lódz, Poland; 1997): 175-84.

Schaller, Barry R. “An American Tragedy: Ambiguous Intent.” A Vision of American Law: Judging Law, Literature, and the Stories We Tell. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997. 89-93. 

St. Jean, Shawn. “Social Deconstruction and An American Tragedy.” Dreiser Studies 28.1 (1997): 3-24.

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser.” Chambers Biographical Dictionary, Sixth Edition. Ed. Melanie Parry. New York: Larousse Kingfisher Chambers, 1997. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Biographical Companion to Literature in English. By Antony Kamm. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 1997. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Cyclopedia of World Authors. Third Edition. Ed. Frank N. Magill. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 1997. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Identities and Issues in Literature. Ed. David Peck. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 1997. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Modern American Literature. Volume 6, Third Supplement. Ed. Martin Tucker. New York: Continuum Publishing, 1997. 

Walhout, M. D. F. O. Matthiessen and the Future of American Studies Prospects 22 (1997):1-34. 

Yardley, Jonathan. “Motoring Toward Home.” Washington Post 27 April 1997. Section: Book World: 3. Review of A Hoosier Holiday, edited by Douglas Brinkley.  

Zhang, Lixin. “’Jiali Meimei’ han ‘Debo Jia de Taisi’ zhi Bi Jiao” [A Comparison of Sister Carrie and Tess of the d’Urbervilles]. Journal of Daqing College 1 (1997): 59-60. 张立新,「《嘉莉妹妹》和《德伯家的苔丝》之比较 」,大庆高等专科学校学报,1997年第17卷第1期,頁59-60。 

Dreiser bibliography, 1996

 

 

Algeo, Ann M. The Courtroom as Forum: Homicide Trials by Dreiser, Wright, Capote, and Mailer. Modern American Literature: New Approaches. New York: Peter Lang, 1996.

Applegate, Edd. “Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Literary Journalism. A Biographical Dictionary of Writers and Editors Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1996. 

Blake, L. “The American City in Literature 1820-1930.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Cambridge, England, 1996. “William Dean Howells and Theodore Dreiser are discussed as realists whose urban novels emerged from a self-conscious synthesis of ante-bellum idealism and machine age materialism.”

Brennan, Stephen C. “Humanism in Dreiser’s The Bulwark.” Dreiser Studies 27.2 (1996): 22-38.

Brinkley, Douglas. “Road Book: The most American of American literary genres is nearly as old as the motorcar itself.” American Heritage 47.7 (Nov. 1996): 56-63. Discusses Dreiser’s A Hoosier Holiday, which “brought the automobile to the forefront of American literature.”
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Cohen, Philip. “Is There a Text in This Discipline? Textual Scholarship and American Literary Studies.” American Literary History 8.4 (1996): 728-44.

Cohen, Philip. Review of Jennie Gerhardt, ed. James L. W. West, III. American Literary History 8.4 (1996): 732-37. “West approaches Jennie Gerhardt’s textual situation from the tradition of eclectic editing. He selects the copy composite manuscript rather than the 1911 edition as his copy text, and he critically emends it with variants from other texts so as to approximate what Dreiser intended to publish.” 

Conn, Peter. Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1996. 208, 417 (n 1). Quotes comment by Buck, upon learning that she had won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1938, that the award “should have gone to Dreiser.’” A footnote cites Ross Terrill’s statement — made in a television documentary on Buck’s life — to the effect that Buck received a “fairly rude” letter from Dreiser after the award was announced. 

Corkin, Stanley. “Sister Carrie and the Natural Power of Things.” Realism and the Birth of the Modern United States: Cinema, Literature and Culture. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1996. 79-104.

Davies, Jude. “Theodore Dreiser and Femininity: Gendering Nature in Naturalism.” Borderlines: Studies in American Culture (Centre for American Studies, University of Swansea) 3.1 (1996): 77-88.

DeHart, Bruce J. Review of Dreiser’s Russian Diary (A96.2). Dreiser Studies 27.2 (1996): 44-46.

DeMarco, Jennifer Ann. “Theodore Dreiser and the Politics of Fiction: A Textual Analysis.” Master’s thesis, U of Connecticut, 1996. v + 85 pp.

Den Tandt, Christophe. “Amazons and Androgynes: Overcivilization and the Redefinition of Gender Roles at the Turn of the Century.” American Literary History 8.4 (1996): 639-64. Comments on The “Genius”. 

Dowell, Richard W. ” ‘There Was Something Mystic About It’: The Composition of Sister Carrie by Dreiser, et al.” Biographies of Books: The Compositional Histories of Notable American Writings. Ed. James Barbour and Tom Quirk. Columbia: U of Missouri P, 1996. 131-59.

Duffus, Robert L. “Too Big to Write Smaller.” New York Times Book Review 6 Oct 1996: 24. Reprint of review of An American Tragedy (New York Times Book Review, 10 January 1926).

Eaton, Mark Andrew. “Critical Mass: Negotiations of Mass Culture in American Novels, 1885-1945.” Ph.D. dissertation, Boston U, 1996. 382 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 1135A. Focuses on novels of Henry James, Wharton, Dos Passos, Dreiser, Richard Wright, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Nathanael West. Chapter 4 discusses how Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Wright’s Native Son redefine success as celebrity and disclose how celebrity preoccupies the movies and newspapers that condition their consumers.  

Fredrickson, Kathy. “Dreiser’s ‘The Girl in the Coffin’; or, What’s Death Got to Do with It?” Dreiser Studies 27.1 (1996): 3-19.

Giles, James R. Review of Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Style (30:3) Fall 1996, 523-24.

Gordeeva, Elena Ur’evna. Filosofskie osnovy tvorchestva T. Draizera i ego obshchestvennaia pozitsia v 30e gody. Novyi kurs F. Ruzvelta: znachenie dlya SShA i Rossii. [Filosophical background of T. Dreiser’s works and his social standing in the 1930s. T. Roosevelt’s new policy and its meaning for the U.S.A. and Russia]. Association for US Studies International conference proceedings. Moscow, 1996, pp. 228-236 Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. Философские основы творчества Т. Драйзера и его общественная позиция в 30-е годы // Новый курс Ф. Рузвельта: значение для США и России: Материалы научной конференции Ассоциации изучения США. – М., 1996. – С. 228-23 

Gordeeva, Elena Ur’evna. Problema prototipa v “Trilogii Zhelania” T. Draizera (ot fakta k khudozhestvennomu obobshcheniu). Sintez kulturnykh traditsii v khudozhestvennom proizvedenii. [The problem of a prototype in t. dreiser’s ‘Trilogy of Desire’ (from a fact to creative generalization). Synthesis of cultural traditions in artwork]. N. Novgorod, 1996. pp. 176-181 Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. Проблема прототипа в “Трилогии желания” Т. Драйзера (от факта к художественному обобщению) // Синтез культурных традиций в художественном произведении. – Н. Новгород, 1996. – С. 176-181 

Gordeeva, Elena Ur’evna. Teodor Draizer i “amerikanskaia mechta” (na materiale “Trilogii zhelania”). Ideino-khudozhestvennoe mnogoobrazie zarubezhnykh literatur novogo in noveishego vremeni. [Theodore Dreiser and the “American Dream” (Based on the Trilogy of Desire). Ideological and artistic diversity of foreign literatures in the new age]. Moscow, 1996. pp. 21-28 Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. Теодор Драйзер и “американская мечта” (на материале “Трилогии желания”) // Идейно-художественное многообразие зарубежных литератур нового и новейшего времени. – М., 1996. – С. 21-28 

Gordeeva, Elena Iur’evna. ‘Trilogia zhelaniia’ T. Draizera: Filosofskaia kontseptsiia i avtorskaia tochka zreniia. [T. Dreiser’s ‘The Trilogy of Desire’: philosophical concept and author’s viewpoint]. Dissertation for the degree of a candidate of philological science. N. Novgorod, 1996. Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. “Трилогия желания” Т. Драйзера: Философская концепция и авторская точка зрения. Дис. … канд. филол. наук. Н. Новгород, 1996 

Greb, Mary Catherine. “Tragedy Transformed: The Fallen Woman in the Novels of Thomas Hardy and Theodore Dreiser.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Kansas, 1996. 172 pp. DAI 57 (1997): 3008A.

Gunning, Sandra. Race, Rape, and Lynching: The Red Record of American Literature, 1890-1912. New York; Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 1996. 26, 49-50. Discusses Dreiser’s story “Nigger Jeff,” focusing on “the possibilities and limitations of a white envisioning of the black home ravaged by the practice of lynching.” 

Gurstein, Rochelle. The Repeal of Reticence: A History of America’s Cultural and Legal Struggles over Free Speech, Obscenity, Sexual Liberation, and Modern Art New York: Hill and Wang, 1996.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. Richard Wright and Racial Discourse. Columbia: U of Missouri P, 1996. Passim. Extensively discusses Dreiser’s “Nigger Jeff” and An American Tragedy in relation to Wright’s works. 

Hammond, Deborah A. “A Project in Set Design for An American Tragedy: The Case of Clyde Griffiths.” Master’s project (M.F.A.), San Diego State U, 1996. vii + 46 pp.

Hapke, Laura. Review of Theodore Dreiser’s Ev’ry Month, ed. Nancy Warner Barrineau. Dreiser Studies 27.2 (1996): 46-8.

Henshaw, William Gordon. “Class Strata As Seen Through Costumes: A Project in Costume Design for the Play An American Tragedy.” Master’s project (M.F.A.), San Diego State U, 1996. vi + 118 pp.

Hutchisson, James M. “The Revision of Theodore Dreiser’s Financier.” Journal of Modern Literature 20.2 (1996): 199-213.

Knight, Bill, ed. The Eye of the Reporter: Literature’s Heritage in the Press. Illinois: n.p., 1996.

Martin, Edward A., ed. In Defense of Marion: The Love of Marion Bloom and H.L. Mencken. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P, 1996. Tells of the Mencken-Marion Bloom affair through selections from their letters and diaries and writings and those of contemporaries including Dreiser and Estelle Bloom, Marion’s sister and Dreiser’s lover and editorial assistant.

Mathews, Carolyn Louise. “Fabricating Identities: Dress in American Realist Novels, 1880-1925.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of North Carolina, 1996. 378 pp. DAI 57 (1997): 5152A. Includes chapter on Sister Carrie.  

Maud, Ralph. Charles Olson’s Reading: A Biography. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1996. 14-15. Provides information about Olson’s acquisition of books by Dreiser and about when Olson probably developed an interest in Dreiser. 

McNamara, Kevin R. ” ‘Makers of Delight’: Sister Carrie and the Romance of Metropolitan Life.” Urban Verbs: Arts and Discourses of American Cities. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 1996, 56-92. See also McNamara, Kevin Richard. “Urban Verbs: Representations of the City in American Modernism.” Diss. U of California, Irvine, 1991. DAI 52A (1991): 1331A.

“Memories of Chester and Billy: Program Booklet of a Public Humanities Symposium Exploring Theodore Dreiser’s Landmark Novel, An American Tragedy, February 16-March 27, 1996.” San Diego: Production Center for Documentation and Drama, San Diego State U, 1996.

Merish, Lori. “Engendering Naturalism: Narrative Form and Commodity Spectacle in U.S. Naturalist Fiction.” Novel: A Forum on Fiction 29.3 (1996): 319-45. Focuses on Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Miller, Donald L. City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. 190, 195-96, 262-63, 279-81, 524, 530-31, passim. Includes several passages on Dreiser with discussions of Sister Carrie; Dreiser and other Chicago writers with whom he was associated; and home builder Samuel Eberly Gross who was the model for the character Samuel E. Ross in Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt.

Milton, Joyce. Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin. New York: HarperCollins, 1996. 429-30.

Mueller, Lisel. “For a Thirteenth Birthday.” Alive Together: New and Selected Poems. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1996. 109-110. A poem by German-born American poet Lisel Mueller referencing Dreiser and Sister Carrie.  

Müller, Kurt. “Theodore Dreiser, Jennie Gerhardt, The University of Pennsylvania Dreiser Edition. Eds. James L. West III. gen. ed. Thomas P. Riggio. textual ed. James L. West III, Lee Ann Draud.” American Studies/Amerikastudien 41 (1996): 311-17. 

Müller, Kurt. Review of New Essays on Sister Carrie, by Donald Pizer Amerikastudien / American Studies 41:4 (1996): 709. 

Murayama, Kiyohiko. “‘Two Mothers Were Weeping and Praying’: Formula Recycled in Theodore Dreiser’s Fiction.” College Language Association Journal 39.3 (1996): 380-93.

O’Connor, John J. Review of Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederick Philip Grove, by Irene Gammel. University of Toronto Quarterly 66.1 (1996): 369-71. 

Perkins, Priscilla Ashley. ” ‘Each One as She May’: Intelligence, Childbirth, and Narrative Interiority in Early Twentieth-Century American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, Rutgers, The State U of New Jersey, 1996. DAI 57 (1996): 684A. 347 pp. Examines narratives by Frank Norris, Gertrude Stein, Dreiser (The “Genius”), and Nell Larsen in the context of early twentieth-century discourses about “intelligence.”
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Peterson, James M. “Playboy’s History of the Sexual Revolution Part I: 1900-1910.” Playboy 43.12 (1996): 66-84.

Pizer, Donald. “‘True Art Speaks Plainly:’ Theodore Dreiser and the Late Nineteenth-Century American Debate over Realism and Naturalism.” Nineteenth-Century Prose 23.2 (1996): 76-89.

Premo, Diane G. Review of Dreiser’s Russian Diary, ed. Thomas P. Riggio and James L. W. West II (1996). Library Journal 1 Nov. 1996: 66-68.

Rand, Francesca. “Theodore Dreiser and the Social Gospel.” Master’s thesis, State U College of New York at Buffalo, 1996. 51 pp. State U College at Buffalo, 1996.

A Reader’s Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers. Ed. Peter Parker. Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 1996.  

Review of Dearest Wilding: A Memoir; with Love Letters from Theodore Dreiser, by Yvette Eastman. Indiana Magazine of History 92.3 (1996): 285-86 

Rhodes, Chip. “Twenties Fiction, Mass Culture, and the Modern Subject.” American Literature 68 (1996): 385-404.

Riggio, Thomas P. “Following Dreiser, Seventy Years Later.” The American Scholar 65.4 (1996): 569-77.

Riggio, Thomas P. Introduction. “‘Gold Teeth’: A Minor American Tragedy,” by Theodore Dreiser. Dreiser Studies 27.2 (1996): 3-27.

Riggio, Thomas P. Introduction. Dreiser’s Russian Diary. Ed. Thomas P. Riggio and James L. W. West III. U of Pennsylvania Dreiser Edition. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1996, pp. 1-19. 

Riggio, Thomas P. Preface. Dreiser’s Russian Diary. Ed. Thomas P. Riggio and James L. W. West III. U of Pennsylvania Dreiser Edition. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1996, pp. xi-xii.

Schroth, Raymond A. “Justice as Focus Groups, Big Royalties, and Geraldo.” National Catholic Reporter 33.8 (1996): 11.

Schurman, Lydia Cushman. “Theodore Dreiser and His Street and Smith Circle.” Dime Novel Roundup 65.6 (1996): 183-95.

Schwarzer, Andrew. “Cheering with Eyes Averted: Businessmen and Speculators in the Novels of Howells, Norris, and Dreiser.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Missouri. 1996. 220 pp. DAI 57 (1997): 5154A.

Sucheta. The Novels of Theodore Dreiser. Creative New Literature. New Delhi, India: Creative Books, 1996. A revision of the author’s Ph.D. dissertation, Jammu U, Jammu, India, 1992.

Swarnalatha, K. “The Moral World of Theodore Dreiser: A Feminist View.” Ph.D. dissertation, Kakatiya U, India, 1996. 

Talty, Stephan. “Canonizers Behind Closed Doors.” New York Times Magazine 6 Oct 1996: 36.

Talty, Stephan. Review of Dearest Wilding: A Memoir, with Love Letters from Theodore Dreiser (1995). Sewanee Review 104.4 (1996): lxxxvi-lxxxvii.

Teres, Harvey M. Renewing The Left: Politics, Imagination, and the New York Intellectuals. New York; Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996. 105, 160-61, 266-68. Reexamines criticisms of Dreiser by critic Lionel Trilling vis-à-vis the views of Popular Front and leftist critics.  

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” A Reader’s Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers. Ed. Peter Parker. Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 1996.  

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English. Ed. Jenny Stringer. New York: Oxford UP, 1996. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Encyclopedia of American Biography. Ed. John A. Garraty and Jerome L. Sternstein. New York: HarperCollins, 1996. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” World Authors 1900-1950. Vol. 2. Ed. Martin Seymour-Smith and Andrew Kimmens. New York: Wilson, 1996. 745-48.

West, James L.W. III. “The Chapter Titles in Sister Carrie: A Problem in Dating.” Dreiser Studies 27.2 (1996): 39-43.

West, James L.W. III. Editorial Principles. Dreiser’s Russian Diary. Ed. Thomas P. Riggio and James L. W. West III. U of Pennsylvania Dreiser Edition. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1996, pp. 20-21.

Wilkinson, Myler. The Dark Mirror/T’omnoye Zerkalo: American Literary Response to Russia. Comparative Cultures and Literatures 10. New York: Lang, 1996. 142.

Wirth-Nesher, Hana. “Theodore Dreiser’s Chicago and New York, Sister Carrie.” City Codes: Reading the Modern Urban Novel. New York; Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1996. 65-84, 203-06 (additional comments on Sister Carrie).

Wolff, Andrea. “Dreiser Constructs Russia.” Dreiser Studies 27.1 (1996): 19-35.

Zayani, Mohamed. “Reading the Symptom: Naturalism, Capitalism, and the Open System.” Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana U, 1996. vii + 210 pp. DAI 57 (1997): 3026A. Through a close analysis of the ludic element in Frank Norris’s Vandover and the Brute, desire in Norris’s McTeague, and rhythms in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, argues that naturalism reflects a society increasingly dominated by the logic of capitalism. .Chapter 4 is entitled “A Rhythmanalytical Approach the Problematic of Everydayness in Sister Carrie.” .See also Zayani, Mohamed. Reading the Symptom: Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, and the Dynamics of Capitalism. Modern American Literature: New Approaches 15. New York: Lang, 1999.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Dreiser bibliography, 1995

 

Albertine, Susan. “Triangulating Desire in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 63-74. 

Anesko, Michael. “Recent Critical Approaches.” The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1995. Ed. Donald Pizer, 77-94.

Angel, Karen. “The Literature of Realism.” Publishers Weekly 8 May 1995: 75-80.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “Central Europe in Travelogues by Theodore Dreiser: Images of Berlin and Vienna.” Images of Central Europe in Travelogues and Fiction by North American Writers. Ed. Waldemar Zacharasiewicz. Transatlantic Perspectives: A Series of Interdisciplinary North American Studies. Tubingen: Stauffenberg, 1995. 144-58.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “Theodore Dreiser’s European Encounters: The Case of Oxford.” Transatlantic Encounters: Studies in European-American Relations; Presented to Winfried Herget [Feitschrift]. Ed. Udo J. Hebel and Karl Ortseifen. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher, 1995. 232-44.

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. ” ‘Housework is Never Done’: Domestic Labor in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 127-35.

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. “Recontextualizing Dreiser: Gender, Class, and Sexuality in Jennie Gerhardt.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 55-76.

Blodgett, E.D. Review of Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederick Philip Grove, by Irene Gammel. Ariel: A Review of International English Literature. 26.4 (1995):17-20. 

Borus, Daniel H. “Dreiser and the Genteel Tradition.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 115-26.

Bower, Stephanie Lore. ” ‘The Common Commercial Flesh of Women’: Prostitution in Turn-of-the-Century American Literature.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Los Angeles, 1995. 242 pp. DAI 56 (1996): 3627A.

Brennan, Stephen C. “Freedom and Tyranny in Textual Editing: The Pennsylvania Dreiser Edition.” Journal of Contemporary Thought 5 (1995): 157-75.

Brennan, Stephen C. “Gender, Language, and Self in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser Studies 26.2 (1995): 3-11.

Broome, Lisa E. “Sister Shahrazade: Prototype for Theodore Dreiser’s Carrie Meeber.” Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association (1995): 1-8.

Burke, John J. “Theodore Dreiser.” From Home and Abroad: American and British Writers in Philadelphia, 1800-1910. Lanham, MD: UP of America, 1995. 87-94.

Calder, J. Kent. “Focus: The Dreiser Papers.” Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History 7.2 (1995): 48.

The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London. Ed. Donald Pizer. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995. Contains three articles cited individually in this bibliography (see under Anseko, Michael; Gelfant, Blache H.; and Lehan, Richard).

Camp, Helen C. Iron in Her Soul: Elizabeth Gurley Flynn and the American Left Pullman, WA: Washington State UP, 1995: 2-3 Begins by discussing the highly publicized arrest of Flynn, then a high school student, after a radical street speech. States that after the arrest, Dreiser invited her to “his home in a rundown section of the South Bronx” for dinner and an interview and that Dreiser wrote an article about Flynn entitled “An East Side Joan of Arc” for the September 1906 issue of Broadway Magazine. The source given is Flynn’s autobiography. Despite this book’s giving a title and publication details, a Dreiser article is not cited in the bibliography. 

Campion, Thomas Baird, Jr. “The Law in Dreiser’s American Dream.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Colorado, 1995. v + 179 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 1615A. Discusses Dreiser’s conception of the law vis-à-vis the American dream of wealth, love, and social acceptance as experienced by the major characters in his novels. U of Colorado catalogue gives 1996 date
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Casciato, Arthur. “How German is Jennie Gerhardt?” West, James L. W. III, ed. Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text, ed. James L. W. West, III, pp. 167-82.

Cassuto, Leonard. “Dreiser’s Ideal of Balance.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text, ed. James L. W. West, III, pp. 51-62.

Cassuto, Leonard “Lacanian Equivocation in Sister Carrie, The Genius, and An American Tragedy.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 112-33.

Clark, Emily. “Samuel E. [G]ross: Dreiser’s Real Estate Magnate.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995. pp. 183-93. Recounts fictionalized portrayal of Gross in Jennie Gerhardt.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Clarke, Donald. The Rise and Fall of Popular Music New York: St. Martin’s P, 1995. States that Theodore Dreiser wrote words to “The Banks of the Wabash.” 

Dale, Alan S. “The Work of Their Lives: Private Experience and the Shape of Realism in Flaubert, James, Dreiser, and Stein.” Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton U, 1995. 271 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 929A. Discusses, among other literary questions, “what blend of modes results when Theodore Dreiser charts his own class ascent in Sister Carrie in the competing terms of his heroine’s career and his own as a narrator.”
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Dardis, Tom. Firebrand: The Life of Horace Liveright. New York: Random House, 1995. 73-85, 155-56, 194-208, 321-29 passim.

Debs, Eugene V. Gentle Rebel: Letters of Eugene V. Debs. Ed. J. Robert Constantine. 3 vols. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1995. III: 62, 65, 341, 344-47, 367-68, 372, 450, 533. Prints four letters from Debs to Dreiser and two from Dreiser to Debs, plus Debs letters with mentions of Dreiser. The Debs to Dreiser letters are in the Penn Dreiser collection. See also “Biographical Sketch” of Debs, I: lxxxii, where it is noted that Upton Sinclair and Dreiser “led cheers for Debs” at a rally in Los Angeles during Debs’s 1925 tour. 

“Dreiser, Theodore (Herman Albert).” The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography. Ed. John S. Bowman. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge UP, 1995. 200.

Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L.W. West III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995. Contains 19 articles cited individually in this bibliography. 

Dunlop, M.H. “Carrie’s Library: Reading the Boundaries Between Popular and Serious Fiction.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 201-15.

Eastman, Yvette. Dearest Wilding: A Memoir, with Love Letters by Theodore Dreiser. Ed. Thomas P. Riggio. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995.

Eby, Clare Virginia. “Jennie Through the Eyes of Thorstein Veblen.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 91-102.

Eisenstein, Sergei M. Beyond the Stars: The Memoirs of Sergei Eisenstein. Selected Works, Volume IV. Ed. Richard Taylor. Trans. William Powell. London: BFI; Calcutta: Seagull, 1995. 11, 48, 103, 326-28, 381-84, 386. Contains a passage in which Eisenstein recalls meeting with Dreiser in Moscow and with Dreiser and Helen Richardson at Dreiser’s Westchester County, NY residence. Contains impressionistic comments about Dreiser’s An American Tragedy, Eisenstein’s conception of a film he had hoped to make based on the novel, and the 1931 film directed by Josef von Sternberg.

Elias, Robert H. “Janus-Faced Jennie.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 3-8.

Faber, Doris, and Harold Faber. “Theodore Dreiser, 1871-1945: A One-Man Literary Factory.” Great Lives: American Literature. Atheneum Books for Young Readers. New York: Atheneum, 1995. 111-20.

Feldman, Ellen Ruth. “Self-Culturing America, 1838-1917.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Chicago, 1995. 281 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 1777A. Explores how the discourse of self-culture, a rhetoric of amelioration or self-betterment, functions in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. Dreiser is among the writers whose works are examined.

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher. “Dreiser and the Discourse of Gender.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 1-30.

Furer, Andrew Jonathan. “‘The Strength of the Strong’: (Re)Forming the Self in ‘Fin-de-Siècle’ American Literature and Culture.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Berkeley, 1995. 304 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 1136A. Focuses on ways in which turn-of-the-century writers represented social, political, and economic anxieties about the health and integrity of the body. Part II, “Social Reform and the Therapeutic Self: The American Dialectic, 1880-1916,” examines works of Dreiser, among others.

Fyfe, Dan. “Real and Imaginary Cities in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Revista de Estudios Norteamericanos (U of Sevilla) 4 (1995): 129-38. 

Gahlhoff, Debra Zoe. “Selling the Body: Representing the Prostitute in Maggie and Sister Carrie.” Master’s thesis, Portland State U, 1995. 88 pp.

Gammel, Irene. “Sexualizing the Female Body: Dreiser, Feminism, and Foucault.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 31-54.

Gelfant, Blanche H. “Speaking Her Own Piece: Emma Goldman and the Discursive Skeins of Autobiography.” Cross-Cultural Reckonings: A Triptych of Russian, American, and Canadian Texts. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture. Cambridge; Eng.; New York: Cambridge UP, 1995. 69-96 (Dreiser pp. 71, 74-77, 83-86.) Reprints article published in American Autobiography: Retrospect and Prospect. Ed. Paul John Eakin (U of Wisconsin P, 1991; cited here). See also pp. 111-12 for discussion of Dreiser’s treatment of his characters vis-à-vis the Canadian writer Ethel Wilson.

Gelfant, Blanche H. “What More Can Carrie Want? Naturalistic Ways of Consuming Women.” The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London. Ed. Donald Pizer. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1995, pp. 178-210.

Gerber, Philip. “Jennie Gerhardt: A Spencerian Tragedy.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 77-90

Gogol, Miriam, ed. Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. New York: New York UP, 1995. Contains 11 essays cited individually herein.

Gogol, Miriam. “‘That Oldest Boy Don’t Wanta Be Here’: Fathers and Sons and the Dynamics of Shame in Theodore Dreiser’s Novels.” Gogol, Miriam, ed. Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism, pp. 95-111.

Gogol, Miriam. “Self-Sacrifice and Shame in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 136-46.

Gogol, Miriam. Introduction. Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. vii-xvii.

Gordeeva, Elena Ur’evna. Teodor Draizer v vuzovskom prepodavanii. Mirovaia literatura v XX v. Problemy izuchenia i prepodavania. [Theodore Dreiser in the university education. World literature in the 20th century. The problems of studying and teaching]. International conference proceedings. Orekhovo-Zuevo, 1995, pp. 8-10 Гордеева, Елена Юрьевна. Теодор Драйзер в вузовском преподавании // Мировая литература в XX в. Проблемы изучения и преподавания: Материалы международной конференции. – Орехово-Зуево, 1995. – С. 8-10 

Gronowicz, Anthony. “Dreiser, Theodore (Herman Albert).” The Encyclopedia of New York City. Ed. Kenneth Jackson. New Haven: Yale UP, 1995. 344-45.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “Jennie, Maggie, and the City.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 147-56.

Herman, Jan. A Talent for Trouble: The Life of Hollywood’s Most Acclaimed Director, William Wyler. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995. 318-31. Discusses the making and critical reception of the film Carrie. 

Humma, John B. “Jennie Gerhardt and the Dream of the Pastoral.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 157-66.

Hussman, Lawrence E. “Jennie One-Note: Dreiser’s Error in Character Development.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 43-50.

Hussman, Lawrence E. “Squandered Possibilities: The Film Versions of Dreiser’s Novels.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 176-201.

Hutchisson, James M. “Death and Dying in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 208-17.

Hutchisson, James M. Review of Dearest Wilding: A Memoir, with Love Letters by Theodore Dreiser, by Yvette Eastman. Dreiser Studies 25.2 (1995): 48-50.

“In the Heart of the Country: American Identities in the Midwest / Theodore Dreiser.” American Diversity, American Identity: The Lives and Works of 145 Writers Who Define the American Experience. Ed. John K. Roth. New York: Holt, 1995. 408-12.

Jacobs, Lea. “An American Tragedy: A Comparison of Film and Literary Censorship.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 15.4 (1995): 87-99.

Keller, Jürg P. “Theodore Dreiser and The Race to the Top.” The American Dream Gone Astray: Critical Realism in American Fiction, 1920-1940. 84-94. European University Studies. Bern: Peter Lang, 1995. Discusses An American Tragedy. Originally a dissertation, U of Zurich, 1994. 

Kelley, George Louis. “Smart Money: Business in American Literature, 1860-1929.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York, Buffalo, 1995. 482 pp. DAI 56 (1996): 2682A. Examines business in the writings of Benjamin Franklin, Cotton Mather, Thoreau, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Howells, Twain, Edith Wharton, Henry James, Dreiser (focusing on the Trilogy of Desire), Frank Norris, Horatio Alger, Upton Sinclair, Edward Bellamy, Henry Adams, Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather, Hemingway, and Faulkner.

Kucharski, Judith. “Dreiser Looks at Longfellow.” Dreiser Studies 26.2 (1995): 30-33. Introduction to Dreiser, Theodore. “The Homes of Longfellow.” Dreiser Studies 26.2 (1995): 34-46.

Kucharski, Judith. “Jennie Gerhardt: Naturalism Reconsidered.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 17-26.

Kwak, Sung-yop. Duraijo: ch`amdoen sam ui ch`uguja. Munhak ui ihae wa kamsang. Seoul: Konguk Taehakkyo Ch`ulp`anbu. 1995 곽승엽. 드라이저: 참된삶의추구자. 문학의이해와감상. 서울시: 건국대학교출판부.1985. In Korean.

Lehan, Richard. “The European Background.” The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London. Ed. Donald Pizer. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1995. pp. 47-76.

Leroy, Hazel Carr. “Declasse Dissemblers: Four Cases of the Presentation of Actresses in Print in America, 1888-1908.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Pittsburgh, 1995. 152 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 33A. Compares the presentation of actresses in a tabloid paper, a novel, a magazine, and a mainstream newspaper in print in the United States in the period between 1888 and 1908. Chapter II discusses Sister Carrie.  

Lewis, Charles Richard. “A Coincidence of Wants: The Novel and Neoclassical Economics.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Minnesota, 1995. 241 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 209A. Chapter topics include “consumer utility theory of naturalist desire and indifference” in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Lingeman, Richard. “The Biographical Significance of Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 9-16.

Literature and Photography Interactions, 1840-1990: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Jane M. Rabb. Albuquerque: U of New Mexico P, 1995. 189-93, 420. Contains brief excerpt from The “Genius” followed by some documentation related to the book’s composition. Also contains letter of Carl Van Vechten to Dreiser dated 18 Oct. 1932.

Livingston, James. “Sister Carrie’s Absent Causes.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 216-46.

Lloyd, Brian. Review of Mechanism and Mysticism: The Influence of Science on the Thought and Work of Theodore Dreiser, by Louis J. Zanine. American Studies 36.1 (1995): 194-95. 

Mencken, H.L. “Dreiser as Philosopher”; “Dreiser as Stylist.” A Second Mencken Chrestomathy. Ed. Terry Teachout. New York: Knopf, 1995. 278-82. Reprint.

Morozkina, Evgeniia Aleksandrovna. Tvorchestvo Teodora Draizera i literaturnoe razvitie SShA na rubezhe XIX-XX vekov. [Theodore Dreiser’s works and literary development of the USA at the turn of the 19-20th centuries]. Dissertation for the degree of a doctor of philological science. St-Petersburg, 1995 Морозкина, Евгения Александровна. Творчество Теодора Драйзера и литературное развитие США на рубеже XIX-XX веков. Дис. д-ра филол. наук. Санкт-Петербург, 1995. 

Morrow, Barbara Olenyik. From Ben Hur to Sister Carrie: Remembering the Lives and Works of Five Indiana Authors. Indianapolis: Guild, 1995.

Moyer, Marsha S. “Theodore Dreiser and Family Values: A Psychocultural Analysis of Sister Carrie in American History.” Master’s thesis, San Diego State U, 1995. v + 171 pp.

Mueller, Cindy Gerlach. “Gender and the Construction of Identity in Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth and Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Master’s thesis, Bradley U, 1995. 69 pp.

Mulligan, Roark. “Monetary Reduction in New Historicist Readings of Dreiser.” Dreiser Studies 26.1 (1995): 20-32.

Murayama, Kiyohiko. “Is Sister Carrie Really Not Anti-Capitalist at All?: Dreiser’s Criticism of Capitalism.” Dreiser Studies 26.1 (1995): 3-10.

Murray, Janet H. “The Rocking-Chair Lover.” Review of Dearest Wilding: A Memoir, with Love Letters from Theodore Dreiser, by Yvette Eastman. New York Times Book Review 2 July 1995: 7

Nilsen, Amelia Margetanski. “A Thematic Analysis of Theodore Dreiser’s Trilogy of Desire.” Master’s thesis. U of Oslo, Norway, 1995. 84 pp. (Hovedoppgave i amerikansk, Universitetet i Oslo.)

Nostwich, T. D. Introduction. Fulfilment and Other Tales of Women and Men, by Theodore Dreiser. Ed. T. D. Nostwich. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow, 1992. 7-16.

O’Connell, Shaun. Remarkable, Unspeakable New York: A Literary History. Boston: Beacon, 1995. 114-20.

Olson Eyde K. “Efficiency Battles Wastefulness in the Progressive Era: A Cultural Analysis of Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.” Master’s thesis, U of Nebraska, 1995. 124 pp.

Orlov, Paul A. “On Language and the Quest for Self-Fulfillment: A Heideggerian Perspective on Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 134-75.

Peng, Dankui. “Theodore Dreiser and His ‘Sister Carrie’.” Journal of Jiaying University 2 (1995): 73-76. In English. 彭丹逵,「德莱塞和他的《嘉莉妹妹》」,嘉应大学学报,1995年第2期,頁73-76。(英文) 

Powell, Dawn. The Diaries of Dawn Powell 1931-1965. Ed. Tim Page. South Royalston, VT: Steerforth P, 1995. 13. Contains a mention of Dreiser which places him dining with certain company on a specific date. 

Review of Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederick Philip Grove, by Irene Gammel. The International Fiction Review: A Biannual Periodical Devoted to International Fiction. 22 (1995): 105-06. 

Riggio, Thomas P. Editorial Note. Dearest Wilding: A Memoir, with Love Letters from Theodore Dreiser, by Yvette Eastman: xii-xiv.

Riggio, Thomas P. Introduction. Dearest Wilding: A Memoir; with Love Letters from Theodore Dreiser, by Yvette Eastman; ed. Thomas P. Riggio. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. ix-xii.

Rosenberg, Seymour. “Unconventional Personalities in Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature: Theodore Dreiser and Thomas Wolfe; Freiburg, June 1995.” Twelfth International Conference on Literature and Psychoanalysis. viii + 295 pp. Lisbon: Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, 1996. 103-06.

Ross, Valerie. “Chill History and Rueful Sentiments in Jennie Gerhardt. West, James L. W. III, ed. Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text, pp. 27-42. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995.

Schopp, Joseph C. “Cowperwood’s Will to Power: Dreiser’s Trilogy of Desire in the Light of Nietzsche.” Nietzsche in American Literature and Thought. Ed. Manfred Putz. Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture. Columbia, SC: Camden House, 1995. 139-54.

Schurman, Lydia Cushman. “Richard Lingeman’s Myth Making: Theodore Dreiser’s Editing of the Jack Harkaway Stories.” Dime Novel Roundup 64.6 (1995): 151-68.

Scura, Dorothy M. Afterword. Scott, Evelyn. Escapade. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1995. 311-13. Quotes from Scott letter to Dreiser of 12 July 1923 in which she complains of censorship of her fictionalized autobiography Escapade.

Shi, David E. Facing Facts: Realism in American Thought and Culture, 1850-1920. New York and Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 1995. 238-52 passim.

Spears, Timothy B. “Sister Carrie and the Logic of Salesmanship.” 100 Years on the Road: The Traveling Salesman in American Culture. New Haven: Yale UP, 1995. 172-91. (See also the author’s dissertation, 1989, listed separately.)

Stewart-Alexander, Selena. “The Depiction of ‘Woman’ in Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Richard Wright’s Native Son.” Master’s Thesis, U of Texas at Arlington, 1995. v + 49 pp. MAI 34 (1996): 68.

Sun, Hong. “Myth and Reality in the Rural and Urban Worlds: A Survey of the Literary Landscape in American and Chinese Regional Literatures.” Ph.D. dissertation, Washington U, 1995. 252 pp. DAI 57 (1996): 674A. Compares transitions between village and the metropolis as reflected in American regional writers (including Dreiser in Sister Carrie) and their Chinese counterparts.

Tanselle, G. Thomas. Review of Jennie Gerhardt, ed. James L. W. West III. TEXT 8 (1995): 462-69. 

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Oxford Companion to American Literature, Sixth Edition. By James D. Hart, with revisions and additions by Phillip W. Leininger. New York: Oxford UP, 1995. 

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Oxford Companion to English Literature. Revised Fifth Edition. Ed. Margaret Drabble. Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 1995.  

Town, Caren J. “Voicing the Tragedy: Narrative Conflict in Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Dreiser Studies 26.2 (1995): 12-29.

Tyler, Danielle. “Index to Volumes 1-25.” Dreiser Studies 26.1 (1995): 33-56.

Volskaia, Inna Sergeevna. “Dikii kapitalizm” v knigakh Draizera. [“Unbridled Capitalism” in the Works of Dreiser]. Massovaia istoriko-literaturnaia biblioteka. Moscow: TOO Nerei, 1995 Вольская, Инна Сергеевна. “Дикий капитализм” в книгах Драйзера. Массовая историко-литературная библиотека. М: ТОО “Нерей”, 1995 

Waldmeir, John C. The American Trilogy, 1900-1937: Norris, Dreiser, Dos Passos, and the History of Mammon. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill P, 1995.

West, James L.W. III. “The Hotel World in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. 194-207. 

West, James L.W. III. Introduction. Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III, pp. vii-ix. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995, pp. vii-ix.

West, James L.W. III. “The Scholarly Editor as Biographer.” Studies in the Novel 27.3 (1995): 295-303.

Whelan, Richard. Alfred Stieglitz: A Biography. Boston: Little, Brown, 1995. 119, 143, 14, 564.

Whyde, Janet M. “Encoding Imperialism: Homelessness in American Naturalism, 1890-1918.” Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State U, 1995. 190 pp. DAI 56 (1996): 4402A. Includes a chapter using Edith Wharton’s Summer and Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt to demonstrate that, because of social expectations that women should embody domestic values, women’s homelessness is represented as a failure to project the self into the world.

Wiedmann, Lorna Ruth. “Suicide in American Fiction, 1798-1909.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Wisconsin, 1995. 444 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 1783A. Sister Carrie is among the works discussed.

Wilson, Christopher P. “Labor and Capital in Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt: New Essays on the Restored Text. Ed. James L. W. III. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1995. pp. 3-14.

Wilson, Edmund. “Theodore Dreiser’s Quaker and Graham Greene’s Priest.” The Uncollected Edmund Wilson. Ed. Janet Groth and David Castronovo. Athens, OH: Ohio UP, 1995. 288-94. Review of The Bulwark. Reprinted from The New Yorker 23 March 1974. Also reprinted in part Theodore Dreiser: The Critical Reception. Ed. Jack Salzman. New York: David Lewis, 1972, pg. 668.

Wilson, Edmund. “Theodore Dreiser’s Tragic America.” The Uncollected Edmund Wilson. Introduction by Janet Groth and David Castronovo. Athens, OH: Ohio UP, 1995. 172-77.

Wilson, Kenneth E. “A New Historicist Reading of Dreiser’s Fiction: Money, Labor, and Ideals.” Dreiser Studies 26.1 (1995): 11-19.

Wolff, Andrea. Fremdbildentwicklung als kommunikativer Prozeß: Eine Untersuchung der Sowjetunionbilder in den Reiseberichten Theodore Dreisers und Dorothy Thompsons [The portrayal of foreign perception as communicative process: An exploration of Soviet imagery in the travel reports of Theodore Dreiser and Dorothy Thompson]. Hamburg: Dr. Kovac, 1995 A slightly altered version of the author’s thesis (Ph.D.), Universität Bielefeld, 1994. 

Zaluda, Scott. “The Secrets of Fraternity: Men and Friendship in Sister Carrie.” Theodore Dreiser: Beyond Naturalism. Ed. Miriam Gogol. New York: New York UP, 1995, pp. 77-94.

Xia, Xiaobin. “The Tragedy of Jeff and the Rising of American Blacks Today.” Journal of Fujian Finance and Accounting Administrator College 2 (1995): 42-44. In English. Xia, Xiaobin,?The Tragedy of Jeff and the Rising of American Blacks Today,福建财会管理干部学院学报,1995年第2期,頁42-44。(英文) 

 

 

Dreiser bibliography, 1994

 

Ammons, Elizabeth. “Men of Color, Women, and Uppity Art at the Turn of the Century.” In American Realism and the Canon. Ed. Tom Quirk and Gary Scharnhorst. Newark: U of Delaware P; London and Toronto: Associated U Presses, 1994: 23. “Dreiser and Norris are in crucial ways simply embarrassing. Dreiser’s sloppiness as a writer and sentimentality as a thinker and Norris’s crude biases and philosophizing disqualify them for inclusion in the great white male writers’ tradition, even if only because they expose too nakedly certain attitudes and values more subtly veiled in the work of their artistic superiors.” 

Anderson, Sherwood. Für Eleanor: geheime Briefe an die Geliebte: ein Nachlass von Sherwood Anderson. Ed. Ray Lewis White. Trans. Gerhard Kelling. Hamburg : Achilla, 1994. German translation of Anderson, Sherwood. Sherwood Anderson’s Secret Love Letters: For Eleanor, A Letter a Day. Ed. Ray Lewis White. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State U P, 1991 (see 1991 bibliography).

Anderson, Sherwood. Introduction. Short Stories, by Theodore Dreiser. New York: Dover, 1994. Dover Thrift Editions. Reprints Anderson’s introduction to 1918 Modern Library Edition. 

Applegate, Edd. “Theodore Dreiser (27 August 1871 – 28 December 1945).” Dictionary of Literary Biography: American Magazine Journalists, 1900-1960. 2nd series, vol. 137. Ed. Sam G. Riley. Detroit: Gale, 1994. 85-95.

Armstrong, Tim. “Addiction, Electricity, and Desire.” Beyond the Pleasure Dome: Writing and Addiction from the Romantics. Ed. Sue Vice, Matthew Campbell, and Tim Armstrong. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic P, 1994. 134-42.

Berthoff, Warner. “Modern Instances: Brooks, Mumford, Dreiser” / “Robert Penn Warren’s Dreiser.” American Trajectories: Authors and Readings, 1790-1970. University Park: Pennsylvania State UP, 1994. 95-99.

Bitzer, Barbara. “Sehnsucht: The Key to the Secret Life, As Illustrated in Selected Modern American Novels.” Ph.D. dissertation, Arizona State U, 1994, 311 pp. DAI 55 (1994): 961A. “Sehnsucht, the Key to Sister Carrie’s Art, Sehnsucht in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie” (thesis chapter).

Brennan, Stephen. C. Review of Mechanism and Mysticism: The Influence of Science on the Thought and Work of Theodore Dreiser, by Louis J. Zanine. Modern Language Studies 24.3 (Summer 1994): 121-23. 

Castle, Dana B. “Male Moral Irresponsibility in Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Master’s thesis, College of William and Mary, 1994. v + 37 pp.  

Clayton, Douglas. Floyd Dell: The Life and Times of an American Rebel. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1994. 4, 72-73, 90-92, 99, 127-30, 193. Provides information about the relationship of Dell and Dreiser and the affairs each had with the actress Kirah Markham. Focuses on significant reviews and evolving critical opinions by each writer of the other. Quotes briefly from correspondence between Dell and Dreiser in the Dell papers at the University of Chicago and in the Penn Dreiser archive.

Clendenning, John. “Desire and Regression in Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Dreiser Studies 25.2 (1994): 23-35.

Coker, Jeffrey W. “A Leftward Glance: The Depression-Era Politics of Dreiser, Dos Passos, and Anderson.” Master’s thesis, Southwest Texas State U, 1994. vi + 91 pp.

Cusk, Rachel. “On the Shelf.” Sunday Times (London) 13 March 1994. Section: Features. Reviews Penguin edition of Sister Carrie. 

Doctorow, E .L. “Theodore Dreiser: Book One and Book Two.” Poets and Presidents. London: Papermac, 1994. Reprint.

Folsom, Franklin. Days of Anger, Days of Hope: A Memoir of the League of American Writers, 1937-1942. Niwot, CO: UP of Colorado, 1994. 28-30, 34, 73, 91, 118, 203, 259. Reports, from firsthand experience, on Dreiser’s activities as a member of the League of American Writers, including his support of the Republican cause during the Spanish Civil War and other political opinions and activities (which are not covered in detail). Quotes in full a 1939 telegram (in the author’s possession) from Dreiser to the Author’s League urging that the League (which did not act on Dreiser’s request) contact Pope Pius XII to urge the him to use his influence to try to persuade Franco to spare victims of the war. Says that Dreiser’s trip to France in 1938 to attend a writer’s conference was partly financed by the Soviet government, unbeknownst to Dreiser. Provides information about radical authors with whom Dreiser associated

Fredrickson, Kathy. “Jennie Gerhardt: A Daughteronomy of Desire.” Dreiser Studies 25.1 (1994): 12-22.

Gammel, Irene. Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederic Philip Grove. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: U of Calgary P, 1994.

Gilbert, Emily. “Naturalist Metaphors in the Literatures of Chicago, 1893-1925.” Journal of Historical Geography 20.3 (1994): 283-304. Discusses The Cliff-Dwellers by Henry Blake Fuller, Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, and Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Goodman, James. Stories of Scottsboro. New York: Pantheon, 1994. 29-30, 47, 189. Provides information and sources with regard to Dreiser’s involvement in the campaign to free the “Scottsboro Boys.” 

Granger, Bill. “Theodore Dreiser: American Dreamer Series: Chicago’s Literary Legacy.” Chicago Tribune 9 October 1994, pg. 23. 

Guest, David Michael. “Sentenced to Death: The American Novel and the Rhetoric of Capital Punishment.” Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt U, 1994. 213 pp. DAI 55 (1995): 1954A. Examines Norris’s McTeague, Dreiser’s An American Tragedy, Capote’s In Cold Blood, and Mailer’s The Executioner’s Song.  

Guy, David. “Experiences of the Void.” New England Review 6.2 (1994): 130-38.

Hall, Murray G. Der Paul Zsolnay Verlag. Von der Gründung bis der Rückkehr aus Dem Exil. Tübingen, Max Niemeyer, 1994. 208-12, 220, 249, 272, 299.

Harmon, Charles Calvin. “The Human Element: Styles of Subjectivity in the United States, 1900-1940.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Wisconsin, 1994. i + 212 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 241A. Compares representations of subjectivity by writers such as Dreiser, Wright, and Faulkner with conceptions of agency that shaped industrial psychology, marketing, and mass culture. The first chapter notes similarities between views in Sister Carrie and the theories and biographies of industrial management pioneers Frank and Lillian Gilbreth.

Hart, Jeffrey. “Reality in America: Yet Once More.” Sewanee Review 102.2 (1994): 631-40.

Hobson, Fred. Mencken: A Life. New York: Random House, 1994. Passim. 

Hutchisson, James M. “The Marguerite Tjader Collection at the Humanities Research Center.” Dreiser Studies 25.2 (1994): 36-40.

Jett, Kevin W. “Cowperwood Revised: A Comparative Analysis of the 1912 and 1927 Editions of Theodore Dreiser’s The Financier.” Master’s thesis, Indiana State U, 1994. v + 99 pp.

Koenig, Rhoda. “Fallen from Fashion-Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser.” The Spectator (London) 26 March 1994: 38.

Lears, Jackson. Fables of Abundance: A Cultural History of Advertising in America. New York: Basic, 1994. 274-81. Examines The “Genius” within the context of a cultural history of advertising. Places Dreiser and his alter ego Eugene Witla in that context, discussing Witla’s experiences in advertising and parallels in Dreiser’s life. Notes that a conflict between authenticity and artifice and between art and commerce is central to the novel and true to Dreiser’s own experience of life.

Leute, Birgit. “Chicago in American Literature: Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. Thesis, Pädagogischen Hochschule. U Freiburg, Germany, 1994 

Lin, Wenchi “Commodity, Performance, and Social Identity in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” 《中央大學人文學報》第十二期. 101-30 , 1994 年 08 月。 

Livingston, James. Pragmatism and the Political Economy of Cultural Revolution, 1850-1940. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1994. 132-33, 139-47, 151-53, 155-57. Claims that the exemplary naturalist novel, Sister Carrie, should be read “as a formal parody of realism.”

McNamara, Kevin R. “The Ames of The Good Society: Sister Carrie and Social Engineering.” Criticism 34.2 (1994): 217-35.

Minter, David. A Cultural History of the American Novel: Henry James to William Faulkner. New York: Cambridge UP, 1994.

Mizuguchi, Shigeo. “Addenda and Corrigenda to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide: English Language Instruction Texts Published in Japan.” Dreiser Studies 25.1 (1994): 51-2.

Morozkina, E.A. T. Draizer i A. Shopengauer: problemy etikii i estetiki. Amerikanskaia literatura v mirovom kontekste. Tezisy dokladov. [Concerning T. Dreiser and A. Schopenhauer: The problem of ethics and aesthetics. American literature in world context. Lecture Notes]. Moscow: MGU, 1994, pp. 34-36. Морозкина Е.А. Т.Драйзер и А.Шопенгауэр: проблемы этики и эстетики // Американская литература в мировом контексте. Тезисы докладов. Москва: МГУ, 1994, с.34-36. Translated and published as “Dreiser and Schopenhauer: The Concept of ‘Desire’.” Dreiser Studies 28.2 (1997). 22-33. 

Morozkina, E.A. Tvorchestvo Teodora Draizera i literaturnoe razvitie SShA na rubezhe XIX-XX vekov. [Theodore Dreiser’s works and the literary development of the U.S.A. at the turn of the 19th-20th centuries]. Ufa: Bashkirskii universitet, 1994. Морозкина Е.А. Творчество Теодора Драйзера и литературное развитие США на рубеже XIX-XX веков. Уфа: Издательство Башкирского университета, 1994 

Morozkina, E.A. Zhanrovye osobennosti romanov T. Draizera “Sestra Kerri” i “Amerikanskaia Tragediia”. Traditsii i vzaimodeistvia v zarubezhnykh literaturakh. [Genre features of T. Draizer’s novels “Sister Carrie” and “An American Tragedy”. Traditions and Interactions of Foreign Literatures]. Perm, 1994, pp. 71-77. Морозкина Е.А. Жанровые особенности романов Т.Драйзера “Сестра Керри” и “Американская трагедия” // Традиции и взаимодействия в зарубежных литературах. Пермь, 1994, с.71-77. 

Moseley, Philip. “Marxist Analysis of Two Novels by Theodore Dreiser.” Master’s thesis, California State U, Long Beach, 1994. iii + 74 pp. Analyzes Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Mulligan, Roark. “The Lost Phoebe.” Masterplots II: Short Story Series. Revised Edition. Ed. Charles May. Pasadena, CA; Hackensack, NJ: Salem P, 1994′ vol. 5, pp. 2447-249. Summarizes story’s plot and discusses story’s theme and narrative technique. 

Mulligan, Roark. “The ‘Realistic’ Application of Irony: Structural and Thematic Considerations in An American Tragedy.” Dreiser Studies 25.1 (1994): 3-11.

Mulligan, Roark Richard. “The World Made Real: Theodore Dreiser’s Rhetoric of Realism.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Oregon, 1994. DAI 55 (1995): 2393A. 431 pp.

Newlin, Keith. “Dreiser’s ‘The Girl in the Coffin’ in the Little Theater.” Dreiser Studies 25.1 (1994): 31-50.

Oldani, Louis J. “Dreiser’s ‘Genius’ in the Making: Composition and Revision.” Studies in Bibliography 47 (1994): 230-52.

Pitoniak, Thomas. “Present Feelings, Distant Reason: Conscience in Sister Carrie.” American Literary Realism 26.3 (1994): 65-81.

Pizer, Donald. Review of Pennsylvania Edition of Jennie Gerhardt (1992). Journal of English and Germanic Philology 93.2 (1994): 275-78.

Powys, John Cowper. “Theodore Dreiser.” Elusive America The Uncollected Essays of John Cowper Powys. Ed. Paul Roberts. 77-100. London: Cecil Woolf, 1994. Reprints three articles by Powys cited in Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide, Second Edition; edited by Donald Pizer, Richard W. Dowell, and Fredric E. Rusch (1991):  “Theodore Dreiser.” Little Review (1915) 2: 7-13 (review of The “Genius”); “Real American Book by Genius Is Star in Literary Heavens,” San Francisco Bulletin, 23 August 1919 (review of Twelve Men); and review of An American Tragedy, Dial (April 1926). Also prints “A Protest,” an unpublished manuscript by Powys now in the Harry Ransom Research Center, U of Texas at Austin; and a review of Dreiser’s Tragic America by Powys that was “possibly published in The Franciscan Herald in 1931, although no record of this has been found. However, it was certainly published, since a proof copy was found among Powys’s unpublished letters” in the Dreiser collection at the U of Pennsylvania.

Pryor, John Clark. “A Violation of Sanctities: The Interrogation of the Popular Press in the Novels of Howells, James, Wharton, and Dreiser.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Massachusetts, 1994. vii + 232 pp. DAI 55 (1994): 568A. Examines the work of authors whose works offer criticisms of the popular press, including Dreiser (in Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy).
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57; Five Colleges Libraries Catalog, online

Reynolds, Guy. Review of the Pennsylvania Edition of Jennie Gerhardt (A92.2). Notes and Queries 41.2 (1994): 280-81.

Riese, Claas. “Strategies in Theodore Dreiser’s Trilogy of Desire to Resolve the Division Between the Material and the Spiritual.” Master’s thesis, Portland State U, 1994. 67 pp.

Riggio, Thomas P. 1994. “The Literary Canon in the Early 1900s.” Papers in Honor of Scully Bradley. Philomathean Society. U of Pennsylvania, 1994.

Rozga, Margaret. “Sisters in a Quest-Sister Carrie and A Thousand Acres: The Search for Identity in Gendered Territory.” Midwestern Miscellany 22 (1994): 18-29.

Seguin, Robert Henry. “Around Quitting Time: Work, Technology, and the Forms of Middle-Class Ideology in Modern American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, Duke U, 1994. 261 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 934A. Examines modern American narrative in relation to the historical development of middle classness in the U.S.A. Asserts that in Sister Carrie Dreiser creates an “urban pastoral” as a realm of middle-class fantasy, a realm which draws on older ideological images of aestheticized labor but significantly updates them. See also the author’s Around Quitting Time: Work and Middle-Class Fantasy in American Fiction (Duke UP, 2001), cited individually here.

Smith, Jonathan Richardson. “The Rise of the Novel Trilogy in the United States, 1890-1940.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Virginia, 1994. 208 pp. DAI 55 (1995): 3194A. “I show how the genre arose in this country in conscious imitations of Sienkiewicz’s Polish trilogy; I suggest the implications for traditional separations among romance, naturalism, and modernism of Dreiser’s borrowing the form from romancer Churchill.”

Smith, Richard Cándida. Review of Mechanism and Mysticism: The Influence of Science on the Thought and Work of Theodore Dreiser, by Louis J. Zanine. Isis 85.4 (December 1994): 732-33. 

Smith, Shawn Michelle. “Superficial Depths: Visions of Identity in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, 1839-1900.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, San Diego, 1994. 469 pp. DAI 55 (1994): 967A. Examines the ways in which “technologies of vision” delivered middle-class representations of gender and race in the nineteenth-century United States. Chapter 4 discusses Dreiser’s “Nigger Jeff” and Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Sterne, Richard Clark. Dark Mirror: The Sense of Injustice in Modern European and American Literature. New York: Fordham UP, 1994. 121-39 passim. Focuses on European and American trial fiction since 1880. Comments on the tension between ethical law and natural law (in the Darwinian sense) in Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.

Swindell, Larry. “The raw power of Dreiser.” Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas) 31 July 1994, pg. 1. “Theodore Dreiser was and is the great grizzly bear of American literature – wild and coarse and powerful, definitely commanding respect, if grudgingly. Smooth prose composition eluded him forever. His style was raw, his sentences often bewildering, and he organized poorly. Dreiser’s major novels are structurally chaotic, causing one to wonder if he outlined his material before commencing a project. To summarize his plots is to enumerate banalities. …” 

Tandlich, Seth Joel. “Hard News and Sensational Stories: Journalistic Authority in the Fiction of Emile Zola, Theodore Dreiser, and John Dos Passos.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Michigan, 1994, 179 pp. DAI 55 (1995): 2380A.

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” Dictionary of the Arts. New York: Facts on File, 1994. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Legends in Their Own Time. New York: Prentice Hall General Reference, 1994. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Reader’s Adviser. 14th ed. Ed. Marion Sader. New Providence, NJ: Bowker, 1994. 

Tipton, Cindy H. “Read All About It: The Media in Richard Wright’s Native Son and Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Master’s thesis, East Tennessee State U, 1994. vi + 53 pp.

Town, Caren J. “The House of Mirrors: Carrie, Lily, and the Reflected Self.” Modern Language Studies 24:3 (1994): 44-54. 

Vasey, Margaret. “Jennie Gerhardt: Gender, Identity, and Power.” Dreiser Studies 2.1 (1994): 23-30.

Walker, Laura. “Feminist Themes in The Awakening and Sister Carrie. Master’s thesis, Montclair State U, 1994. 64 pp.

Watson, William Lynn. “Imagining Workers: The Working-Class Presence in Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature.” Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State U, 1994. 371 pp. DAI 55 (1995): 3516A. Examines how late nineteenth-century realist and naturalist narratives defuse the working class drive for class self-determination and political power. Texts examined include Sister Carrie.

West, James L. W. III. “Dreiser and The Road to Buenos Ayres.” Dreiser Studies 25.2 (1994): 3-8. An introduction by West to the reprint (published in the same issue, pp. 9-22) of Dreiser’s introduction to The Road to Buenos Ayres, by Albert Londres, which was first published in English in 1928 with Dreiser’s introduction.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

 

Dreiser bibliography, 1993

 

Adams, Ray M. “Theodore Dreiser, Darwinism, and Literary Naturalism.” Master’s thesis, Southern Illinois U Carbondale, 1993. iii + 118 pp.

Banta, Martha. Taylored Lives: Narrative Productions in the Age of Taylor, Veblen, and Ford. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1993. 185-188, 295-308 passim. Examines literary texts in the context of contemporaneous theories of management. Discusses Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy “as being about a young man who is unable to apply the principles of the American System to others with the adroitness to which they are applied to him.”
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Bell, Michael Davitt. “Fine Styles of Sympathy: Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” The Problem of American Realism: Studies in the Cultural History of a Literary Idea. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1993. 149-65. A cultural history of the concepts of “realism” and “naturalism” in American literature. Offers case studies of Howells, Twain, and James; Norris, Crane, and Dreiser; and Sarah Orne Jewett.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Bellman, S. I. Review of Pennsylvania Edition of Jennie Gerhardt (A92.2). Choice, March 1993: 1463.

Ben Arfi, Khmais. “Les ambigüités du naturalisme américain et l’évolution vers l’expression subjective de la réalité” [Ambiguities of American Naturalism and Progress Toward the Subjective Expression of Reality]. Ph.D. dissertation (Thèse Doctorat: Lett), Université d’Aix-Marseille I. 1993, 572 pp.. Discusses Frank Norris, Dreiser, and Sherwood Anderson. 

Bender, Madge Helene. “The Rhetoric of Birth Control: ‘The Love Rights of Women’ in the Early Twentieth Century Novels of Henry James and Theodore Dreiser.” Ph.D. dissertation, Tulane U, 1993. DAI 54 (1993): 1360A. 292 pp. iv, 286 pp.

Burns, Sarah. “The Price of Beauty: Art, Commerce, and the Late Nineteenth-Century American Studio Interior.” American Iconology: New Approaches to Nineteenth-Century Art and Literature. Ed. David C. Miller. New Haven: Yale UP, 1993. 209-38

Celard, Caroline. “Theodore Dreiser, A Harp in the Wind Variations on Naturalism.” Master’s thesis (Maîtrise), Université de Rouen, France, 1993. 94 pp.

Coltrane, Robert Morton, Jr. “Dreiser’s Twelve Men: A Biographical and Textual Analysis.” Ph.D. dissertation, Pennsylvania State U, 1992. 313 pp. DAI 53 (1993):2369A. 302 pp.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Conway, J. North. “Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945): Sister Carrie, 1900.” American Literacy: Fifty Books That Define Our Culture and Ourselves. New York: Morrow, 1993. 183-88.

Crunden, Robert M. American Salons: Encounters with European Modernism, 1885-1917. New York: Oxford UP, 1993. 113-18, 190-92. Provides an account of the American encounter with European Modernism up to the U.S.’s entry into World War I and of salons in Chicago, Paris, and New York where American artists and intellectuals gathered, including Dreiser.

Davies, Julian C. H. ” ‘Blown to bits’: Theodore Dreiser and Spencerian scepticism, 1892-1901.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of York, England, 1993. 266 pp. DAI 56 (1995): 568C.

Den Tandt, Christophe. “The Urban Sublime in American Literary Naturalism.” Ph.D. dissertation, Yale U, 1993. 553 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 2577A. Discusses Sister Carrie, The “Genius,” and the Cowperwood Trilogy. See also Den Tandt, Christophe. The Urban Sublime in American Literary Naturalism. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1998.

Doctorow, E. L. “Theodore Dreiser: Book One and Book Two.” Jack London, Hemingway, and the Constitution: Selected Essays, 1977-1992. New York: Random House, 1993. 21-38. Combines 1982.11 and 1983.9.

Dunleavy, Linda Ellen. “Women’s Place, Women’s Voice: Counter-Narrative in the Fiction of Melville, Dreiser and Faulkner.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York, Buffalo, 1993. 199 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 3434A-35A. Analyzes Melville’s Pierre, Dreiser’s An American Tragedy, and Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57

Epstein, Daniel Mark. “Freeing ‘Jennie’ of Censor’s Hand: Dreiser’s Heroine Is Redressed.” Washington Times 10 Jan. 1993: B7. Review of Pennsylvania edition of Jennie Gerhardt.

Epstein, Joseph. “A Great Good Girl: Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt.” The New Criterion 11.10 (June 1993): 14-20.

Filler, Louis. “Theodore Dreiser and the Anti-Progressive Drive.” Biography 16.3 (1993): 249-57. An essay which reevaluates Dreiser’s social attitudes and examines the accuracy of stereotypical views of Dreiser (propagated sometimes by himself) as a trailblazer, foe of censorship and convention, crusader for sexual liberation and other progressive causes. Examines legends, falsehoods, and distortions propagated about the publication of Sister Carrie and other milestones in Dreiser’s career as a writer and public intellectual.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Fleming, Robert E. Review of Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide, by Donald Pizer, Richard W. Dowell, and Frederic E. Rusch. American Literary Realism 25.3 (1993): 88-89.

Foley, Barbara. “The Politics of Poetics: Ideology and Narrative Form in Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Native Son.” Reprinted: Richard Wright: Critical Perspectives Past and Present. Ed. Henry Louis Gates Jr. and K. A. Appiah. Amistad Literary Series. New York: Amistad. 1993. 188-99.

Fowler, Mina. “Personal and Media Influences in Theodore Dreiser’s Work.” Master’s thesis, California State U, Dominguez Hills, 1993. ii + 34 pp.

Funk, Robert. “Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Explicator 51.4 (1993): 232-34.

Gerber, Philip L. “Theodore Dreiser: Changing Trains in Chicago.” Exploring the Midwestern Literary Imagination: Essays in Honor of David D. Anderson. Ed. Marcia Noe. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1993. 70-85.

Gleason, William Albert. “Playing for Keeps: Recreation and Re-Creation in American Literature, 1840-1940.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Los Angeles, 1993. 496 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 3029A. Published as The Leisure Ethic: Work and Play in American Literature, 1840-1940. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 1999.

Goodrich, Norma Lorre. Heroines: Demigoddess, Prima Donna, Movie Star. New York: Harper, 1993. 127-28, 247-48. Briefly discusses Sister Carrie as representing one of male authors’ various views on fallen women in literature. Comments on the origins of Drouet’s name in Sister Carrie and on Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights as a prototype for Hurstwood.

Griffin, Joseph. Review of Fulfilment and Other Tales of Women and Men (A92.1). Studies in Short Fiction 30.3 (1993): 412-13.

Harris, Susan K. “Vicious Binaries: Gender and Authorial Paranoia in Dreiser’s ‘Second Choice,’ Howell’s ‘Editha,’ and Hemingway’s ‘The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber.’” College Literature 20.2 (1993): 70-82.

Hunsberger, Laurel Roger. “Performance in a Dramatized Culture: American Urban Fiction (1900-1941).” Ph.D. dissertation, U of East Anglia, England, 1993. Traces the shift during the first four decades of the twentieth century from an objective to a subjective orientation of the self in American urban fiction. Evaluates Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and The Financier, Wharton’s The House of Mirth, Lewis’s Babbitt, and Dos Passos’s Manhattan Transfer.

Kazin, Alfred. “Dos educaciones: Edith Wharton y Theodore Dreiser.” In Kazin, Alfed. En tierra nativa: Interpretación de medio siglo de literatura norteamericana. Mexico: FCE, 1993. 85-101. (Translation of a chapter from Kazin’s On Native Grounds.)

Kern, Alexander. Review of Newspaper Days, by Theodore Dreiser, edited by T. D. Nostwich. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. 117.1-2 (1993): 125-26.

Leach, William R. Land of Desire: Merchant’s Power and the Rise of a New American Culture. New York: Pantheon, 1993.

Lin, Wenchi. “The Performance of Identity in Sister Carrie, A Passage to India, The Lover, and A City of Sadness.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York, Stony Brook, 1993. vii + 208 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 4083A.

Lingeman, Richard. “A Few Changes, Mr. Dreiser.” Review of Pennsylvania Edition of Jennie Gerhardt (1992). New York Times Book Review 7 Nov. 1993: 33-34.

Lingeman, Richard. “The Titan.” American Heritage 44.1 (1993): 72-80.

Lingeman, Richard. Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey. New York: J. Wiley and Sons, 1993. An Abridged one-volume edition.

Lofquist, Paul Brian. “Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie: A Critical Study.” Master’s thesis, Wayne State College, 1993. 81 pp.

Loving, Jerome. “Dreiser’s Novel About a Nun.” Lost in the Customhouse: Authorship in the American Renaissance. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1993. 195-210. Examines Dreiser’s realistic and successful portrayal of Sister Carrie both in the context of Dreiser’s own experiences (female models in his own life and family) and as a breakthrough in portraying realistically a liberated middle class, working woman, the New American Woman “who breaks out of the domestic cycle and survives in the world of men and money.”
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Lydon, Michael. “Justice to Theodore Dreiser.” Atlantic Monthly 272 (August 1993): 98-101.

Mencken, H. L. My Life As Author and Editor. Ed. Jonathan Yardley. New York: Knopf, 1993. 124-69, 174-75, 217-25, 388-94 passim

Metzger, Robert Alan. “The Sinister Sublime: A Study of the Success Myth and the Grotesque in American Fiction, 1899-1985.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Los Angeles, 1993. 521 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 3033A. Focuses on seven twentieth-century American novels including Dreiser’s An American Tragedy to explore the way the pursuit of “success” often leads to the “grotesque” in such works.

Mouri, Irtaru. Doraisa Genkyu [The study of Dreiser]. Ousaka, Japan: Osaka Kyoiku, 1993. 468 pp ライサー ケンキュウ ドライサー研究 / 毛利至著 Publisher 大阪 : 大阪教育図書 Year 1993.7 Physical description xi,468p ; Authors 毛利, 至 <モウリ, イタル> 

Nicolaysen, Leonora. “Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie: A Century of Censorship.” Master’s thesis, Eastern Washington U, 1993. v + 112 pp.

Pitoniak, Thomas Francis, Jr. “Conscience in the Novels of Theodore Dreiser.” Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia U, 1993. 305 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 2581 A. Analyzes Sister Carrie, Jennie Gerhardt, An American Tragedy, and The Bulwark.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Pizer, Donald. “American Literary Naturalism and the Humanistic Tradition.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 36-53.

Pizer, Donald. “American Literary Naturalism: The Example of Dreiser.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 54-68. Reprints essay first published in American Fiction: Historical and Critical Essays, ed. James Nagel (Northeastern UP, 1977).

Pizer, Donald. “American Naturalism in Its ‘Perfected’ State: The Age of Innocence and An American Tragedy.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 153-66. Reprints essay first published in The Age of Innocence and An American Tragedy.” Edith Wharton: New Critical Essays, edited by Alfred Bendixen and Annette Zilversmi (New York: Garland, 1992).

Pizer, Donald. “Dreiser and the Naturalistic Drama of Consciousness.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 69-84. Reprints essay first published in Journal of Narrative Technique 21.2 (1991).

Pizer, Donald. “Frank Norris’ Definition of Naturalism.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 120-23. Reprints portions of essay published in Realism and Naturalism in American Literature, Rev. Ed. (Southern Illinois UP, 1984).

Pizer, Donald. “Nineteenth-Century American Naturalism: An Approach through Form.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993.40, pp. 102-9. Reprints essay first published in Forum (Houston; 1976) and portions of Pizer’s essay “Late Nineteenth Century American Naturalism” in Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth Century American Literature (Southern Illinois UP, 1984).

Pizer, Donald. “Nineteenth-Century American Naturalism: An Essay in Definition.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 85-101. Reprints article published as “Nineteenth-Century American Naturalism: An Essay in Definition” (Bucknell Review, vol. 13, 1965) and as “Late Nineteenth-Century American Naturalism” in Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1966; revised edition 1984).

Pizer, Donald. “Self-Censorship and the Editing of Late Nineteenth-Century Naturalistic Texts.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 133-52. Reprints article published in Textual Criticism and Literary Interpretation, edited by Jerome J. McGann (U of Chicago P, 1985).

Pizer, Donald. “Stephen Crane’s Maggie and American Naturalism.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 124-32. Reprint of a portion of article by Pizer entitled “Late Nineteenth-Century American Naturalism” published in Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Rev. ed. (Southern Illinois UP, 1984).

Pizer, Donald. “The Problem of Philosophy in the Naturalistic Novel.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 110-19. Reprint of article first published in Bucknell review (spring 1970).

Pizer, Donald. “The Study of American Realism.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 1-10.

Pizer, Donald. “The Three Phases of American Literary Naturalism.” The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993, pp. 13-35. Reprint of Twentieth-Century American Literary Naturalism: An Interpretation. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1982. ix-xii, 3-10, 13-16, 85-89, 150-52.

Pizer, Donald. The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993. Contains 12 articles by Pizer cited individually here.

Prozorov, Vladimir. Mechta i tragedia: po stranitsam amerikanskoi klassiki XIX-XX vekov. [Dream and tragedy: the American classics of the 19th and 20th centuries]. Petrozavodsk, Russia: Karelskii ped. institut, 1993. Прозоров, Владимир. Мечта и трагедия: по страницам американской классики XIX-XX веков. Петрозаводск, Россия: Карельский пед. институт, 1993. 

Regnery, Henry. “Theodore Dreiser: A Great Writer in Spite of Himself.” Creative Chicago: From the Chap-Book to the University. Evanston: Chicago Historical Bookworks, 1993. 139-63.

Reising, Russell J. “Lionel Trilling, The Liberal Imagination, and the Emergence of the Cultural Discourse of Anti-Stalinism.” Boundary 2 20 (1993): 94-124.

Review of New Essays on Sister Carrie, edited by Donald Pizer. Journal of American Studies 1993 27(3): 426-428. 

Review of Newspaper Days, by Theodore Dreiser; edited by T. D. Nostwich. Indiana Magazine of History 89 (1993): 62-63. 

Rolfe, Edwin. “Essay on Dreiser (1871-1945)” [poem]. Collected Poems. Ed. Cary Nelson and Jefferson Hendricks. American Poetry Recovery Series. Urbana,IL: U of Illinois P, 1993. 157-59. An elegy for Dreiser written in Beverly Hills, California the day after Dreiser’s death. Reprinted in Rolfe, Edwin. Trees Became Torches: Selected Poems. Ed. Cary Nelson and Jefferson Hendricks. American Poetry Recovery Series. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1995.

Rose, Linda “Before the Loathsome Crowd: Women on Stage in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century American Literature.” PhD. dissertation, Purdue U, 1993. 250 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 3439A. Discusses Sister Carrie. 

Rumely, John, “Municipal Bond Morality Tale from 1912: It Really Does Depend on Who You Know.” Bond Buyer 30 Aug. 1993: 25.

Shawcross, Nancy M. “Theodore Dreiser Papers, University of Pennsylvania.” Dreiser Studies 24.1-2 (1993): 3-163.

Strychacz, Thomas. “Dreiser’s Suit Against Paramount: Authorship, Professionalism, and the Hollywood Film Industry.” Prospects 18 (1993): 187-203.

Strychacz, Thomas. “The Plots of Murder: Un/Original Stories in Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Modernism, Mass Culture, and Professionalism. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture 65. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993. 84-116.

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” American Cultural Leaders. From Colonial Times To The Present. By Justin Harmon et al. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1993. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Cambridge Guide to Literature in English. Ed. Ian Ousby. London: Hamlyn Publishing Group, Cambridge [England]; New York : Cambridge UP, 1993 

Wershoven, Carol. Child Brides and Intruders. Women’s Studies Series. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State U Popular P, 1993. 60-77, 151-58. A study of heroines in literature. Works discussed include Sister Carrie, Jennie Gerhardt, and An American Tragedy.

Whited, Lana Ann. “Naturalism, the New Journalism, and the Tradition of the Modern American Fact-Based Homicide Novel.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of North Carolina, 1993. 357 pp. DAI 54 (1994): 3753A.

Zanine, Louis J. Mechanism and Mysticism: The Influence of Science on the Thought and Work of Theodore Dreiser. Philadelphia, U of Pennsylvania P, 1993.

 

 

Dreiser bibliography, 1992

 

Algeo, Ann M. “The Courtroom as Forum: Homicide Trials by Dreiser, Wright, Capote, and Mailer.” Ph.D. dissertation, Lehigh U. 1992. iv + 220 pp. DAI 53 (1992): 1516A. Published as The Courtroom as Forum: Homicide Trials by Dreiser, Wright, Capote, and Mailer. Modern American Literature: New Approaches. New York: Peter Lang, 1996.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “Dreiser’s English Virgil.” Literature im Kontext — Literature in Context. Festschrift für Horst W. Drescher zum Geburtstag. Ed. Joachim Schwend, Susanne Hagemann, and Hermann Völkel. Scottish Studies. Frankfurt/Main: Peter Lang, 1992. 345-71.

Bardeleben, Renate von. Review of Identität und Rolle bei Theodore Dreiser: eine Untersuchung des Romanwerks unter rollentheoretischem Aspekt by Kurt Müller Amerikastudien / American Studies 37:4 (1992): 683-85. 

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. “Dreiser’s Debt to Balzac.” American Literary Realism 24.2 (1992): 70-80.

Bendjeddou, Yazid. “The Dreiser-Sinclair Relationship.” Revue des Langues 10 (1992): 53-60.  

Bremer, Sidney H. Urban Intersections: Meetings of Life and Literature in United States Cities. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1992. 71-72, 79. Briefly discusses Sister Carrie as a representative Chicago novel in which the city’s “magnetic” power is emphasized. Comments on The Titan being based on research Dreiser undertook at the Newberry Library in Chicago and as having a “déjà vu effect.”

Bujnyc´ka, T. O. Fil´, T. I. “Osoblyvosti perekladu leksyko-hramatyc?nych povtoriv z determinantamy”[Special features of the German translation of lexical-grammatical repetitions with determinants in Th. Dreiser’s novel “American Tragedy]. Fil: Inozemna filolohija = Inostrannaja filologija (L´viv) 104 (1992): 151-58. 

Carey, G.O. Review of Pennsylvania Edition of Newspaper Days, edited by T. D. Nostwich. Choice 29.9 (1992): 1389-90.

Chesler, Ellen. Woman of Valor: Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement in America. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1992. 101, 200. Contains a couple of mentions of Dreiser: stating that Dreiser taught writing at the Ferrer Center Association (aka Modern School), a progressive school in New York City and noting Dreiser’s attendance at the First American Birth Control Conference in New York in 1921. (The source for the statement that Dreiser taught at the Modern School is not made explicit and the statement may be inaccurate.) 

De Grazia, Edward. Girls Lean Back Everywhere: The Law of Obscenity and the Assault on Genius. New York: Random House, 1992. 98-142, 150-65, passim.

Dong, Hengxun. “Theodore Dreiser: “A Great Writer Who Wrote Badly” [original title]. American Studies Quarterly 2 (1992): 141-153. 董衡巽,「德莱塞:『一位文笔拙劣的大作家』」,美国研究,1992年第2期,頁141-153。 

Eby, Clare Virginia. “The Psychology of Desire: Veblen’s ‘Pecuniary Emulation’ and ‘Invidious Comparison’ in Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.” Studies in American Fiction 21.2 (1993): 191-208.

Eden, Edward Farrell. “The Work of Women’s Desire in Turn-of-the-Century American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Virginia, 1992. 225 pp. DAI 54 (1993): 519A. Uses Sister Carrie among other works to investigate how women’s desires to escape domesticity were portrayed in turn-of-the-nineteenth century novels.

Fender, Stephen. Sea Changes: British Emigration and American Literature. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1992. 338-41. Includes discussion of Sister Carrie. 

Filler, Louis. “Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945): Suspended Judgment.” Distinguished Shades: Americans Whose Lives Live On. Ovid, Michigan: Belfry, 1992. 174-80. Provides a sketch and overview of Dreiser’s life and works, interspersed with critical commentary.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1992.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 63-66.

Gammel, Irene. “Victims of Their Writing: Grove’s In Search of Myself and Dreiser’s The ‘Genius’.” ARIEL 23.3 (1992): 49-70.

Gammel, Irene. “Two Odysseys of ‘Americanization’: Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Grove’s A Search for America.” Studies in Canadian Literature 17.2 (1992): 129-47.

Gerber, Philip L. “Learning His Craft: Dreiser as Journalist.” Resources for American Literary Study 18.2 (1992): 170-78. Review of Theodore Dreiser’s “Heard in the Corridors”: Articles and Related Writings, ed. T. D. Nostwich and Theodore Dreiser: Journalism, Volume One, ed. T. D. Nostwich.

Gerber, Philip. Theodore Dreiser Revisited. Twayne’s United States Authors Series. New York: Twayne, 1992.

Giles, Paul. “Isolation and Integration: Theodore Dreiser and James T. Farrell.” American Catholic Arts and Fictions: Culture, Ideology, Aesthetics. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1992. 134-68.

Goodman, Nan. ” ‘A Nation at Risk’: Personal Injury and Liability in American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard U, 1992, 246 pp. DAI 53 (1993): 3907A. Chapter 3 discusses the preoccupation with probability and the attenuation of causation in the case of Palsgraf v. Long Island R.R. Co. (1928), as well as in Dreiser’s An American Tragedy, Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey, and Dos Passos’s U.S.A. trilogy. 

Grazia, Edward. Girls Lean Back Everywhere: The Law of Obscenity and the Assault on Genius. New York: Random, 1992. 98-142, 150-65, passim.

Gross, Klaus-Dieter. “Dreiser: An American Tragedy (1925).” Zwischen Romantik, Naturalismus und Moderne: Strömungen des Realismus in amerikanischen Romanen und Gemälden der Zeit zwischen 1920 und 1940 [Between Romanticism, Naturalism, and Modernism: Trends of Realism in American Novels and Paintings in the Era between 1920 and 1940]. Sprache und Literatur: Regensburger Arbeiten zur Anglistik und Amerkanistik. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1992. 120-33. A slightly revised version of the author’s Ph.D. dissertation, U Regensburg, 1991. 

Hankey, Leone Sandra. “The Power of Naming: Women and Law in Twentieth Century American Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Los Angeles, 1992. 317 pp. DAI 53 (1993): 3212A. 

Hapke, Laura. “Defenders Of Her Life: O. Henry and Dreiser.” Tales of The Working Girl: Wage-Earning Women in American Literature, 1890-1925. New York: Twayne; Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada; New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1992. 

Hapke, Laura. Tales of the Working Girl: Wage-Earning Women in American Literature, 1890-1925. New York: Twayne, 1992. Twayne’s Literature and Society Series. Ch. 4, “Defenders of Her Life: O’Henry and Dreiser,” pp. 69-85; also 122-23.

Hitt, Jim. “The Rise of Realism: Henry James, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Ellen Glasgow, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Booth Tarkington.” Words and Shadows: Literature on the Screen. Secaucus, NJ: Carol, 1992. 60-63.

Holdefer, Charles. “Finding a Voice for Sexual Experience in Sister Carrie and Jennie Gerhardt.” pp. 53-66 in Groupe de Recherche et d’Etudes Nord-Américaines, Voix et langages aux Etats-Unis, I. Provence, France: Pubs. de l’Univ. de Provence; 1992. Notes: Actes du colloque des 20, 21 & 22 mars 1992.

Holdefer, Charles. “L’accueil critique des premiers ouvrages de Theodore Dreiser et de Henry Miller: l’evolution des horizons d’attente [The Critical Reception of the Early Works of Theodore Dreiser and Henry Miller: The Evolution of the Horizons of Expectation].” Ph.D. dissertation. U of Paris IV, 1992.

Humma, John B. “Sister Carrie and Thomas Hardy, Regained.” Dreiser Studies 23.1 (1992): 8-26.

Hussman, Lawrence. Review of New Essays on Sister Carrie, edited by Donald Pizer. Antioch Review (50:3) 1992, 592-3. 

King, Daniel P. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 (1990.22). World Literature Today 66.1 (1992): 137-38.

Kinsaul, Lucia A. “The Rudest American Author: Grant Richards’ Assessment of Theodore Dreiser.” Dreiser Studies 23.1 (1992): 27-37.

Lingeman, Richard. “Mencken and Dreiser: Friends, When Speaking.” New York Times Book Review 8 March 1992: 1, 25, 27, 29.

Loughery, John. Alias S. S. Van Dine. New York: Scribner’s, 1992. 13, 26, 112, 118, 135. A biography of Willard Huntington Wright, pioneering art critic and editor of The Smart Set, who numbered Dreiser among his friends and who, under the pseudonym S. S. Van Dine, became a best-selling mystery author.

Maltby, Richard. ” ‘To Prevent the Prevalent Type of Book’: Censorship and Adaptation in Hollywood, 1924-1934.” American Quarterly 44.1 (1992). 554-83.

McCain, Terry James. “The Myth of the American Work Ethic: Sinclair, Dreiser, and Wright.” Master’s thesis, U of Waterloo, Canada. 1992. viii + 97 pp. MAI 31.2 (1993): 568.

Mizuguchi, Shigeo. “Addenda and Corrigenda to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide: Japanese Translations of Writings by Theodore Dreiser.” Dreiser Studies 23.1 (1992): 38-41.

Moreland, Kim, Review of New Essays on Sister Carrie, edited by Donald Pizer. American Studies International 30.2 (1992);108-09.

Morelli-White, Nan. ” ‘When Waters Engulf Us We Reach for a Star’: Psychomachic Struggle in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 13-27.

Morozkina, E.A. Draizer o sotsialno-politicheskikh i kulturno-protsvetitelskikh reformakh v Rossii. Rekonstruktsia i peresmotr istorii ameirkanskoi literatury: kanon, feminizm, etnos. Tezisy dokladov konferentsii. [Dreiser on the sociopolitical, cultural and educational reforms in Russia. Reconstruction and reform of American literal history: canon, feminism, ethnicity. Thesis conference notes]. Moscow: MGU, 1992, pp. 142-144. Морозкина Е.А. Драйзер о социально-политических и культурно-просветительских реформах в России // Реконструкция и пересмотр истории американской литературы: канон, феминизм, этнос. Тезисы докладов конференции. Москва, МГУ, 1992, с.142-144. 

Morozkina, E.A. Polemika M. Tvena s G. Spenserom no problemam kartiny mira i chelovechestva. Nauchnaia kartina mira kak fenomen kultury. Tezisy konferentsii. [The Dispute of M. Twain and H. Spencer Concerning Problems of the Picture of World and Humanity: The Scientific Picture of World As a Cultural Phenomenon.] Conference Proceedings. Ufa, 1992, pp. 77-83. Морозкина Е.А. Полемика М.Твена с Г.Спенсером по проблемам картины мира и человечества // Научная картина мира как феномен культуры. Тезисы конференции. Уфа, 1992, с.77-83. 

Morris, Matthew Jerome. “The American Documentary Novel in the Age of John Dos Passos.” Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell U, 1992. vi + 286 pp. DAI 52 (1992): 4331A. Includes chapter on An American Tragedy.

Moss, Marilyn Ann. “Theodore Dreiser.” A Sourcebook of American Literary Journalism: Representative Writers in an Emerging Genre. Ed. Thomas B. Connery. New York: Greenwood, 1992. 143-50

Murayama, Kiyohiko. “Recovering Dreiser’s Criticism of Capitalism.” The American Review 26 (1992): 165-84. The Japanese Association for American Studies Article originally published in English.  

Nathanson, Carol. “Anne Estelle Rice: Theodore Dreiser’s ‘Ellen Adams Wrynn.’ ” Woman’s Art Journal 13.2 (1992-93): 3-11.

Neal, L. J. “Dreiser’s Signatures of the Industrial City: Testing the Myths and Dreams of American Society.” Ph.D. dissertation, Keele U, England, 1992.  

Newlin, Keith. “Expressionism Takes the Stage: Dreiser’s ‘Laughing Gas’.” Journal of American Drama and Theatre 4.1 (1992): 5-22.

Pizer, Donald. “American Naturalism in Its ‘Perfected’ State: The Age of Innocence and An American Tragedy.” Edith Wharton: New Critical Essays. Ed. Alfred Bendixen and Annette Zilversmit. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities. New York: Garland, 1992. 127-41.

Rains, James William, Jr. “Impossible Justice: Theodore Dreiser’s Search for Identity.” Master’s thesis, U of Montana, 1992. 155 pp.  

Review of After Eden: The Secularization of American Space in the Fiction of Willa Cather and Theodore Dreiser, by Conrad E. Ostwalt, Jr. Journal of American Studies 26 (April 1992): 120-22. 

Riggio, Thomas P. “Dreiser and the Limitations of Canonical Acceptance.” Margin to Mainstream: The Broadening of the American Literary Canon: Lectures from a Symposium Held October 29, 1988, in Honor of E. Sculley Bradley by the Philomathean Society. Ed. Eugene A. Bolt Jr. and Constance D. Harsh. Philadelphia: Philomathean Society, 1992. 13-25.

Robins, Natalie S. Alien Ink: The FBI’s War on Freedom of Expression. New York: William Morrow, 1992. 80-84. Discusses surveillance of Dreiser by the FBI, quoting extensively from Dreiser’s FBI file. 

Rusch, Frederic, and Nancy Warner Barrineau. “1990 Supplement to Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 28-37.

Rusch, Frederic. “Unexpurgated Dreiser.” Review of Pennsylvania Edition of Newspaper Days (1991). Dreiser Studies 23.1 (1992): 45-49.

Ryan, Susan Marie. “Dreiser’s Waifs and Geniuses: The Hierarchy of Judgment in Sister Carrie.” Master’s thesis, U of North Carolina, 1992. iv + 59 pp

Schnackertz, Hermann Josef. Darwinismus und Literarischer Diskurs: Der Dialog mit der Evolutionsbiologie in der Englischen und Amerikanischen Literatur. E. Bulwer-Lytton, S. Butler, J. Conrad, Ch. Darwin, Th. Dreiser, G. Gissing, H. Spencer, K. Vonnegut, H. G. Wells [Darwinism and Literary Discourse: The Dialogue with Evolutionary Biology in English and American Literature: E. Bulwer-Lytton, S. Butler, J. Conrad, Ch. Darwin, Th. Dreiser, G. Gissing, H. Spencer, K. Vonnegut, H. G. Wells]. Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 1992.

Seltzer, Mark. Bodies and Machines. New York: Routledge, 1992. 30-31.

Seret, Roberta. “The ‘Genius’ by Theodore Dreiser.” Voyage into Creativity: The Modern Künstlerroman. Studies in European Thought. New York: Lang, 1992. 143-53.

Sloane, David E. E. Sister Carrie: Dreiser’s Sociological Tragedy. Twayne’s Masterwork Studies. New York: Twayne, 1992.

Stern, Frederick C. “A New Dreiser Biography-For Our Time.” Review 14 (1992): 259-69. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman.

Sterne, Richard C. “Dreiser’s Sense of ‘Injustice’ in An American Tragedy.” Legal Studies Forum 16.3 (1992): 333-51.

Sucheta, Rani. “Social Vision of Theodore Dreiser’s Fiction.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Jammu, India, 1992. 

“Theodore Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945).” They Also Wrote for the Fan Magazines: Film Articles by Literary Giants from E. E. Cummings to Eleanor Roosevelt, 1920-1939. Ed. Anthony Slide. Jefferson, NC, and London: McFarland, 1992. 14-20. 

Thomson, David. Showman: The Life of David O. Selznick. New York: Knopf, 1992. 558. 

Tieck, William A. The Locale of Theodore Dreiser’s Kingsbridge Experience. New York: Kingsbridge Historical Society, 1992. Focuses on the various people and places Dreiser described in his posthumously published memoir An Amateur Laborer, during a period when he was living in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx. NOTE: The book was written by the Bronx County Historian. It was copyrighted and received an ISBN, but was never published. The sole copy belongs to the Kingsbridge Historical Society and is in the possession of the society’s president. Plans were made to publish the book, but this has not occurred yet.

Wallace, Jack E. “The Comic Voice in Dreiser’s Cowperwood Narrative.” On Humor. Ed. Louis J. Budd and Edwin H. Cady. The Best from American Literature. Durham: Duke UP, 1992. Reprints article published in American Literature 53 (March 1981). 

Wallner, Elisabeth. “Female and Male Sexuality in Selected Naturalistic Novels.” Master’s thesis (Dipl.-Arb.), Graz U, Austria, 1992, 100 pp.

Weber, Ronald. The Midwestern Ascendancy in American Writing. Midwestern History and Culture. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1992. 55-68, 87-90, 98-100 passim.

West, James L.W. III. “C. B. De Camp and Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser Studies 23.1 (1992): 2-7.

Wexler, Alice. “Emma Goldman and the Anxiety of Biography.” In The Challenge of Feminist Biography: Writing the Lives of Modern American Women. Ed. Sara Alpern, Joyce Antler, Elisabeth Israels Perry, and Ingrid Winther Scobie. Women in American History. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1992. 38. 

Zaluda, Scott. “Between Wonder and Entanglement: Fictions of Community and Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Ph.D. dissertation, City U of New York, 1992. iv +320 pp. DAI 53 (1993): 4325A.

Zaluda, Scott. “Hurstwood and Tammany, ‘An All-Controlling Power’.” Dreiser Studies 23.2 (1992): 3-12.

 

Dreiser bibliography, 1991

 

“Airmail Interview: Richard Lingeman.” Dreiser Society Newsletter 1.1 (1991): 2-5.

Anderson, Sherwood. Sherwood Anderson’s Secret Love Letters: For Eleanor, A Letter a Day. Ed. Ray Lewis White. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State U P, 1991. 12, 19, 57, 63, 79, 200. Contains letters of Anderson with mentions of Dreiser and opinions of Dreiser’s work. Also published in German; see separate entry, Anderson, Sherwood. Für Eleanor: geheime Briefe an die Geliebte: ein Nachlass von Sherwood Anderson (1994). 

Armstrong, Tim. “The Electrification of the Body at the Turn of the Century.” Textual Practice 5 (1991): 303-25. Explains how in the nineteenth century the fascination with electricity created a new sense of the body as circuitry. Argues that light imagery in Sister Carrie reveals Carrie to be “a desiring machine” and that Clyde’s electrocution in An American Tragedy represents the “absorption” of a human being into “a system of production” indifferent to moral guilt or innocence. See also his Armstrong, Tim. “Electrifying the Body.” Modernism, Technology, and the Body: A Cultural Study. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1998.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “Personal, Ethnic, and National Identity: Theodore Dreiser’s Difficult Heritage.” Interdisziplinaritat: Deutsche Sprache und Literature im Spannungsfeld der Kulturen. Festshrift fur Gerhart Mayer zum 65. Geburtstag. Ed. Martin Forstner and Klaus von Schilling. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1991. 319-40. Explores Dreiser’s efforts to come to terms with his German heritage. Focuses on his visit to Germany as recounted in A Traveler at Forty and the uncut typescript of that book. Argues that the memento mori of seeing his own name on a tombstone in Mayen, his father’s birthplace, constitutes the book’s structural and emotional center and marks Dreiser’s closest identification with his heritage, though he continues to feel “isolated personally and culturally.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Bardeleben, Renate von. “The Thousand and Second Nights in 19th-Century American Writing: Echoes in the Work of Irving, Poe, Twain, and Dreiser.” Festgabe fur Hans-Rudolph Singer. FAS/Publikationen des Fachbereichs Angewandte Sprachwissenschaft der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz in Germersheim: Reihe A, Abhandlungen und Sammelbäande. Ed. Martin Forstner. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1991. 855-86. Discusses how nineteenth-century writers, lacking any direct knowledge of Arabic culture, relied upon the “secondhand image” supplied by the Thousand and One Nights. Finds that Twain’s Life on the Mississippi establishes the “pattern” of describing American cities in terms of Aladdin’s lamp, a pattern Dreiser adapts to his naturalistic enterprise in Sister Carrie to express “the magic and mysterious forces” that rule human destiny.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. “Standard Bibliography Revised and Expanded.” Review of Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide, Second Ed., ed. Donald Pizer, Richard W. Dowell, and Frederic E. Rusch. Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 42-44. 

Barrineau, Nancy Warner. “The Second Issue of Ev’ry Month: Early Roots of Dreiser’s Fiction.” Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 23-32. Shows how Dreiser’s editorial comments anticipate the aesthetic revealed in Sister Carrie. Focuses on Dreiser’s rejection of European models, his embrace of American theater, his attempt at writing towards a mixed-gender audience, and his positive attitude towards social and industrial progress.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Boasberg, Leonard W. “Theater’s Big ‘Sister’ People’s Light’s Massive Production, Based on Theodore Dreiser’s ‘Sister Carrie,’ Runs Six Hours, Has 250 Characters and 19 Actors. It’s ” ‘Our ‘Nicholas Nickleby,’ ” Says One of the Founders of the Company.” Philadelphia Inquirer 31 March 31 1991, pg. G1. Review of The People’s Light and Theater Company’s production of Sister Carrie. 

Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. Review of Free and Other Stories, by Theodore Dreiser in Dietrich Bonhoeffer Werke, ed. Eberhard Bethge et al. 10:396-397 17 vols. 1986-1999. Vol. 10. Barcelona, Berlin, Amerika 1928-1931. Munich: Chr. Kaiser, 1991. In German. 

Brennan, Stephen C. “The Financier: Dreiser’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell.” Studies in American Fiction 19.1 (1991): 55-69. Argues that Dreiser was inspired by Ernst Haeckel’s The Riddle of the Universe to create a new mythology based on outmoded Christian patterns. Finds Cowperwood both Satanic and Christlike in his rises and falls and in his creation of a personal moral system in an amoral universe.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Casciato, Arthur D. “Dictating Silence: Textual Subversion in Dreiser’s Soviet Diary.” Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27 (spring 1991): 174-90. Traces the impact of the sexual on the textual in the construction of Dreiser’s diary of his 1928 trip to the Soviet Union. Discusses the merging of Dreiser’s voice and that of his secretary Ruth Kennell in the diary and Dreiser’s later removal of Kennell’s presence in the 1928 Liveright edition of Dreiser Looks at Russia.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Cassidy, Thomas John. “Desire and Representation in Twentieth Century American Realism.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York, Binghamton, 1991. DAI 52 (1991): 914A. Finds in Sister Carrie and works by Cather, Hurston, and Morrison a critique of “male-authored marriage” that is also an “analogous critique of forms of representation” that posit the dominance of subject over object. Concludes that these works implicitly valorize “community-based relationships” and a “community of voices” with which to express “reality.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Cassuto, Leonard. “From the 1890s to the 1990s: Sister Carrie on the Modern Stage.” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 26-32. Reviews 1991 production of Sister Carrie by The People’s Light and Theater Co. in Malvern, Pennsylvania.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Clark, Mike. “New in Stores.” USA Today. 7 June 1991, pg. 3D. Provides brief critical comments about the film “Carrie” occasioned by a release of a DVD of the film. 

Coltrane, Robert. “The Crafting of Dreiser’s Twelve Men.” Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 191-206. Analyzes Dreiser’s selection and ordering of sketches for Twelve Men and his revision of previously published material. Examines the autobiographical elements of the sketches, proposing that the characters are “consistent with others in the Dreiser canon.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55.

Das, Dilip K. “The American Family in Transition: Some Turn-of-the-Century Images.” Indian Journal of American Studies 21.2 (1991): 47-54.

Dearborn, Mary V. The Happiest Man Alive A Biography of Henry Miller. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991. Shows that Miller’s first sustained piece, Clipped Wings, a potboiler based on his stint as a manager for Western Union dispatch, was inspired by Dreiser’s Twelve Men. 

Den Tandt, Christophe. “Animistic Economics in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” BELL: Belgian Essays on Language and Literature (1991): 88-99.

Dowell, Richard. “Dreiser Meets Fitzgerald . . . Maybe.” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 20-25. Surveys six accounts of a party hosted by Dreiser in the winter of 1922 23, at which Dreiser and F. Scott Fitzgerald allegedly became acquainted. Concludes from accounts by H. L. Mencken, Sherwood Anderson, Carl Van Vechten, Llewelyn Powys, Ernest Boyd, and Burton Rascoe that the event was a “dismal failure.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55.

Eby, Clare Virginia. “Cowperwood and Witla, Artists in the Marketplace.” Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 1-22. Maintains that among Dreiser’s protagonists, Frank Cowperwood in The Financier and Eugene Witla in The “Genius” most fully represent Dreiser’s vision of “the genius,” though Cowperwood transcends Witla as an artist. Concludes that, in Dreiser’s view, wealth may lead to art but art will not lead to wealth.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55; Literature Online (Chadwyck-Healey)

El-Baaj, Habib. “Thomas Hardy and Theodore Dreiser: A Comparative Study.” Diss. U of Glasgow, 1991. DAI 52 (1991): 2134A-2135A.

Erstein, Hap. “Fine ‘Sister Carrie’ Leads Philly Drama Renaissance.” Washington Times 25 Apr. 1991: E1-2. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Fink, Guido. ” ‘Inesprimere l’esprimibile’: tre romanzi americani del 1925.” Rivista di studi nord-americani 2 (1991): 37-52. In Italian. Discusses Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Dos Passos’s Manhattan Transfer, and Drieser’s An American Tragedy.

Fleming, Bruce E. Passivity and the Unhappy (Wo)Man: Mental States in Sister Carrie. Indian Journal of American Studies 21.2 (1991): 39-45

Fluck, Winfried. “Sentimentality and the Changing Functions of Fiction.” Sentimentality in Modern Literature and Popular Culture. Ed. Winfried Herget. Tübingen, Germany: Gunter Narr, 1991. 28-32.

Friedl, Bettina. “Die Inszenierung im Spiegel: Aspekte Pikarischen Erzählens bei Theodore Dreiser und Edith Wharton,” pp. 217-34, in Frauen und Frauendarstellung in der englischen und amerikanischen Literatur [Women and Images of Women in British and American Literature]. Ed. Therese Fischer-Seidel. Tübinger Beiträge zur Anglistik. Tübingen: Gunter, Narr, 1991.

Gammel, Irene. “Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederick Philip Grove.” Ph.D. dissertation, McMaster U (Ont., Canada), 1991. vii + 329 pp. DAI 54 (1993): 510A. Published as Sexualizing Power in Naturalism: Theodore Dreiser and Frederic Philip Grove. Calgary (Alberta, Canada): U of Calgary P, 1994. Examines representations of power in Dreiser’s and Grove’s fiction.
Source: Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (fall 2000): 39-57; McMaster U, online catalogue

Gammel, Irene. “The City’s Eye of Power: Panopticism and Specular Prostitution in Dreiser’s New York and Grove’s Berlin.” Canadian Review of American Studies 22.2 (1991): 211-27. Compares the treatment of women in the city in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Frederick Philip Grove’s Fanny Essler.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Gatti, Rose. “What Dreiser’s Handwriting Reveals.” Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991), pp. 207-13. Analyzes Dreiser’s handwriting in the manuscript of “A Story of Stories.” Concludes that Dreiser was a man of “deep, unexpressed emotions” who felt sympathy towards human weaknesses and anger at the “the powers that be.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Gelfant, Blanche H. “Speaking Her Own Piece: Emma Goldman and the Discursive Skeins of Autobiography.” American Autobiography: Retrospect and Prospect. Ed. Paul John Eakin. Wisconsin Studies in American Autobiography. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1991. 235-66. Compares the theme and style of anarchist Emma Goldman’s autobiography Living My Life and Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, which have similar beginnings. Concludes that Dreiser was one of many influences on Goldman’s book, having told her that she “had to” write it. Reprinted: Gelfant, Blanche H. “Speaking Her Own Piece: Emma Goldman and the Discursive Skeins of Autobiography.” Cross-Cultural Reckonings: A Triptych of Russian, American, and Canadian Texts. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture. Cambridge; England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1995. 69-96.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Gerber, Philip. ” ‘A Beautiful Legal Problem’: Albert Lévitt on An American Tragedy.” Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991), 214-42. Introduces lawyer Albert Lévitt’s 1926 prize-winning essay, “Was Clyde Griffiths Guilty of Murder in the First Degree?”

Gordon, Mary. “Good Boys and Dead Girls.” Good Boys and Dead Girls. New York: Viking, 1991. 3-23. Places Clyde Griffiths in a tradition of “boy killers,” such as Faulkner’s Joe Christmas and Updike’s Rabbit Angstrom, who retain their innocence despite causing the deaths of women who restrain their freedom. Argues that Dreiser’s melodramatic handling of Roberta’s death violates the novel’s realistic “moral vision,” which lures readers into identifying with Clyde.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “New Approaches to Carrie.” Review of New Essays on Sister Carrie, edited by Donald Pizer. Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 37-41. 

Hapke, Laura. “Dreiser and the Tradition of the American Working Girl Novel.” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 2-19. Agrees with previous scholarship that Dreiser accurately portrays the “economic, social, and psychological forces” that shaped the lives of wage-earning women. Finds “ambivalence” in Dreiser’s treatment of the type, however, since his Carrie Meeber and Jennie Gerhardt, like the heroines of contemporary labor novels, are “too refined” to remain long in the world of laboring women and require rescue by a male savior.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Hayne, Barrie. “Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Rough Justice: Essays on Crime and Literature. Ed. M. L. Friedland. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1991. 170-86. Explores whether An American Tragedy is the “sociological treatise” Sergei Eisenstein was denied the chance to film in 1930 or “the simple detective story” or love story Paramount wanted. Concludes that Eisenstein was largely correct and that the book is a “crime novel” governed by the “presuppositions of naturalism.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Henry, Sarah M. “The Strikers and Their Sympathizers: Brooklyn in the Trolley Strike of 1895,” Labor History 32.3 (1991): 329- 53. Not about Dreiser per se, but the strike was the one described in Sister Carrie. 

Hochman, Barbara. “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Actress: The Rewards of Representation in Sister Carrie.” New Essays on Sister Carrie. The American Novel. Ed. Donald Pizer. 43-64. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991. Refutes Dreiser’s claims that he wrote Sister Carrie largely in bursts of solitary inspired creativity. Asserts that Carrie’s career as actress reveals both Dreiser’s stake in maintaining “creative autonomy” and his “need for editorial and moral support” from a “responsive audience.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Horwitz, Howard. “Dreiser, Debs, and Deindividualization: Hypothecation, Union, Representation.” By the Law of Nature: Form and Value in Nineteenth Century America. New York; Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991. 192-217. Examines Dreiser’s Trilogy of Desire in the context of Emersonian doctrine.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Hurm, Gerd. “Theodore Dreiser: Sister Carrie.” Fragmented Urban Images: The American City in Modern Fiction from Stephen Crane to Thomas Pynchon. Neue Studien zur Anglistik und Amerikanistik. Frankfurt am Maim: Peter Lang, 1991. 133-65.

Hussman, Lawrence E. “More Grist for Dreiser’s Mill.” Review of Dreiser issue, Papers on Language and Literature (vol. 27, no. 2, 1991). Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 44-45. 

Hutchisson, James M. “The Creation (and Reduction) of The Financier.” Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 243-59. Offers a textual history of The Financier. Discusses the radical alterations in the novel from its inception in 1911 through the much shorter 1927 edition. Scrutinizes editorial revisions by Ripley Hitchcock and H. L. Mencken and Dreiser’s desire to comply with them.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

James, Harold. “The Literary Financier.” The American Scholar 60 (1991): 251-57. Tracks the rise and fall of the financier as a prominent character type in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Considers Dreiser’s The Financier as a “particularly accurate” depiction of the turn-of-the-century Philadelphia Stock Exchange. Compares Dreiser’s financier with those of Trollope, Balzac, and Thomas Mann.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Jameson, Frederic. Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. Durham: Duke UP, 1991. 200-210. Agrees with Walter Benn Michaels, in The Gold Standard and the Logic of Naturalism (1987), that Dreiser’s work expresses rather than critiques the ideology of consumer capitalism. Argues, however, that Dreiser’s very failure to escape the “infernal machine” of market culture reveals a potential for radical change from within that culture.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Keeble, Robert Leslie. “Dreiser’s Method: Triangles, Motive, Tension, and Contrast in Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.” Master’s Thesis. Stephen F. Austin State U, 1991. vii + 104 pp. MAI 30 (1992): 29. Examines Dreiser’s method of using love triangles to depict his characters’ motives, regulate their tension, and reveal the contrasts in their lives. Focuses on Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55; Ralph W. Steen Library, Stephen F. Austin State U, online catalogue; ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Kimmel, David P. “Crane, Sinclair, and Dreiser in the Temperance Tradition.” Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State U, 1991, 294 pp. DAI 52 (1991): 1747A-48A Explores the relationship between literary forms and the temperance tradition in four turn-of-the century novels, including Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55.

Kingston, Jeremy. “US Theater: Premiere Weekend Philadelphia.” London Times 1 May 1991. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Lehan, Richard. “Sister Carrie: the City, the Self, and the Modes of Narrative Discourse.” New Essays on Sister Carrie. The American Novel. Ed. Donald Pizer. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991. 65-85. Argues that Sister Carrie should be read as a narrative in the “naturalistic mode,” as an “exercise” in rendering Herbert Spencer’s deterministic universe of “matter in motion.” Rejects New Historicist readings by Walter Benn Michaels and June Howard treating Carrie as a metaphor for capitalism or history, respectively. Concludes that an edition recognizing the novel’s naturalistic mode would be a “composite” of the 1981 Pennsylvania Edition and the first edition.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Lenard, G. T. “New Lives, New Names: Dreiser’s Carrie.” Midwestern Miscellany 19 (1991): 29-36. Discusses how the names given Carrie by others mark the changes in her life and in her social roles. Concludes that Hurstwood’s “nameless” corpse reveals his absolute loss of identity while Carrie’s choosing the stage name of Madenda indicates a limited assumption of power and freedom.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Lingeman, Richard. “Airmail Interview: Richard Lingeman.” Dreiser Society Newsletter 1.1 (1991): 2-5. 

Lingeman, Richard. “Mencken, Dreiser, and God.” Menckeniana 119 (1991): 1-9. Recounts the stormy friendship between Dreiser and Mencken, positing that “a hairline crack” in their friendship occurred very early on when the “pagan” Mencken’s attack on prayer offended Dreiser with his lingering “craving for the absolute.” Finds that this essential opposition, along with an “aristocratic-peasant” enmity, eventually became a “geological fault,” though mutual love and respect endured to the end.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Lingeman, Richard. “Theater.” The Nation 27 May 1991: 711-12. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Livingston, Paisley. Literature and Rationality: Ideas of Agency in Theory and Fiction. Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 1991. 89-149 passim. Discusses basic questions about agency and rationality raised in the fiction of Dreiser, focusing on The Financier, An American Tragedy, and Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Lo, Aboubacry Samba. “Theodore Dreiser’s Complex Vision of Success and Failure in ‘Sister Carrie’ and ‘The Financier.’” Master’s thesis, l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal, 1991.

Lutz, Tom. “Making It Big: Theodore Dreiser, Sex, and Success.” American Nervousness, 1903: An Anecdotal History. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1991. 38-62. Considers Dreiser’s treatment of his own neurasthenia of 1903 (in An Amateur Laborer) in the context of a culture obsessed with success and military conquest. Also traces “neurasthenic themes” in The “Genius” and An American Tragedy.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Major 20th-Century Writers: A Selection of Sketches from Contemporary Authors. Ed. Bryan Ryan. Gale Research, 1991. 871-76.

Masters, Marcia Lee. “Ghostwriting for Theodore Dreiser.” Chicago Tribune 10 November 1991, sec. 10: 33. An article by the daughter of Edgar Lee Masters about her associations with Dreiser, notably in Los Angeles near the end of his life. Provides details about her ghostwriting of stories that were published under Dreiser name in Esquire.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

McNamara, Kevin Richard. “Urban Verbs: Representations of the City in American Modernism.” Ph.D., dissertation, U of California, Irvine, 1991. 2 vols. vii + 397 pp. DAI 52A (1991): 1331A. Discusses Sister Carrie in relation to James’s The American Scene, Williams’s Paterson, and other works. Explores how the circulation of money, desire, and other “objects” either “aids or problematizes” efforts to give “unity” to the city’s diverse elements.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55; U of California, Irvine, library, online catalogue

Menzer, Paul. “Bibliographical Anomalies in the Foreword of The Color of a Great City.” Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 33-38. Demonstrates that Dreiser’s foreword to his 1923 collection offers “an apocryphal version of the articles’ origins” by claiming much later dates of composition than the actual ones. Suggests that Dreiser was hiding the fact that many of these journalistic pieces were “quick copy written for ready cash” during his free-lance days.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Michaels, Walter Benn. “An American Tragedy, or the Promise of American Life.” The New American Studies: Essays from Representations. Berkeley: U of California P, 1991. 171-98. Argues that An American Tragedy illustrates the erasure of difference between the individual and the social. Discusses Clyde Griffiths’ attempt to “drift” across classes while maintaining his individuality, and concludes that one has to belong to a class to be considered an individual.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Mishra, Ramesh Chandra. “Theodore Dreiser and the City: A Study of Ambivalent Response.” Ph.D. dissertation, Utkal University, India, 1991. 

Mitchell, Lee Clark. Introduction. Jennie Gerhardt, by Theodore Dreiser. New York: Oxford UP, 1991. ix-xxx.

Mitchell, Lee Clark. Introduction. Sister Carrie, by Theodore Dreiser. New York: Oxford UP, 1991. vii-xxiv.

Mizruchi, Susan. “Fiction and the Sense of Society.” The Columbia History of the American Novel. Ed. Emery Elliott (General Editor); Cathy N. Davidson, Patrick O’Donnell, Valerie Smith, and Christopher P. Wilson (Associate Editors). New York: Columbia UP, 1991. 189-215. Argues: “The works of Theodore Dreiser offer a different perspective on naturalism by highlighting a modern capitalist social order that has subsumed the natural. In contrast to Norris’s degenerate (and eminently expendable) social types, Dreiser’s fiction features functional types who become dysfunctional. … Thus, where Norris’s naturalism tends to corroborate a social evolutionary scheme, Dreiser’s naturalism, by showing how such a scheme justifies and entrenches a man-made social system, tends to challenge it.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Mizuguchi, Shigeo. “Nippon niokeru Theodore Dreiser no Shoshi.” [Bibliography of Theodore Dreiser in Japan] Geibei Bunqaku [English and American Literature] 51 (1991): 157-206.

Morozkina, E.A. Problemy iskusstva v tvorchestve T. Draizera. Istoria i kultura SShA v amerikanskoi literature i zhurnalistike. Tezisy dokladov. [Aspects of the art and work of T. Dreiser. History and culture of the U.S.A. in American literature and journalism. Lecture notes.] Moscow: MGU, 1991, pp. 35-36. Морозкина Е.А. Проблемы искусства в творчестве Т.Драйзера // История и культура США в американской литературе и журналистике. Тезисы докладов. Москва: МГУ, 1991, c.35-36. 

Mory, Kathrin. “The Construction of Inevitability in Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.” Thesis (licentiate), U Basel, Switzerland, 1991. Liz. Arbeit Basel.

Muller, Kurt. Identitat und Rolle bei Theodore Dreiser: Eine Untersuchung des Romanwerks unter Rollertheoretischem Aspekt Beiträge zur englischen und amerikanischen Literatur. Paperborn, Germany: Schoningh, 1991. A revision of the author’s Habilitationsschrift — Universität Freiburg i. Br., 1987. Discusses role playing in Sister Carrie, The Financier, The Titan, and An American Tragedy. Places the novels in the context of a society whose fragmentation prevents the development of a coherent self. Applies analysis of the novels to Dreiser’s own life.
Source: Sauer, Thomas. “Dreiser’s Novels and Role Theory.” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 33-37; Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (fall 1999): 39-55; WorldCat; Literature Online (Chadwyck-Healey)

Murphy, James F. The Proletarian Moment: The Controversy over Leftism in Literature. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1991. 142-47, passim. Discusses Case of Clyde Griffiths, the stage adaptation by Erwin Piscator of Dreiser’s An American Tragedy, as an example of “proletarian” or “political” theater. Also contains scattered references to Dreiser as a supporter of leftist causes and of the reaction of leftist critics to his works. 

Myers, Robert M. “Dreiser’s Copy of McTeague.” Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 260-67. Concludes from Dreiser’s bookplate and his typical marginalia that a copy of the 1903 edition of McTeague in the University of Miami library once belonged to Dreiser. Surveys Dreiser’s accounts of reading McTeague and finds no direct influence on Sister Carrie.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Nathan, David. “Philly Goes for the Long Shots.” Jewish Chronicle 3 May 1991. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

New Essays on Sister Carrie. Ed. Donald Pizer. The American Novel. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991. Includes four essays and an introduction, annotated elsewhere in this bibliography.

Newlin, Keith. “Melodramatic Naturalism: London, Garland, Dreiser, and the Campaign to Reform the American Theater.” Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana U, 1991, xiii + 309 pp. DAI 52 (1992): 2925A Challenges the idea that naturalistic drama is an offspring of realism and that Eugene O’Neill was the first serious American dramatist. Argues that Dreiser and others employed the conventions of melodrama to express evolutionary thought, creating an experimental “hybrid” form dealing with subjects previously confined to the novel and preparing the way for O’Neill.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55; Indiana University library, online catalogue

Niven, Penelope. Carl Sandburg: A Biography. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1991 246, 268-269, 460 Quotes from correspondence among Dreiser, Sandburg, and Edgar Lee Masters. 

Nurul Huda A.Razzaq. “Naturalistic Strain in the Novels of Theodore Dreiser and Naguib Mahfouz.” Ph.D. dissertation, Osmania University, India, 1991. 

Oriard, Michael. Sporting with the Gods: The Rhetoric of Play and Game in American Culture. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991. passim. 

Pietkiewicz, Karen Judith. “Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie: A Study of Transformation and Change in the Artistic Feminine Psyche.” Master’s thesis, Lakehead U, Canada, 1991. 104 pp. MAI 31 (1993): 83. 

Pizer, Donald, Richard W. Dowell, and Frederic E. Rusch. Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1991. Second edition of the authoritative bibliography.

 

Pizer, Donald. “Dreiser and the Naturalistic Drama of Consciousness.” Journal of Narrative Technique 21.2 (1991): 202-11. Argues that, contrary to prevailing criticism, naturalistic novelists did often “seek to write a drama of consciousness.” Focusing on moments of crisis in the lives of George Hurstwood, Lester Kane, and Clyde Griffiths, demonstrates Dreiser’s growing sophistication in rendering an internal drama of conflicting desires by means of “concrete analogues,” whether metaphorical or literal.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Pizer, Donald. Introduction. New Essays on Sister Carrie. The American Novel. Ed. Donald Pizer. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991, pp. 1-22.

Pizer, Donald. Preface. Sister Carrie: An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism. 2nd ed. Ed. Donald Pizer. Norton Critical Editions. New York: Norton, 1991, pp. viii-x. Briefly surveys the critical history of Sister Carrie and defends the use of the 1900 first edition as copy-text as opposed to the holograph, the copy-text for the 1981 Pennsylvania Edition.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Plank, Kathryn M. “Dreiser’s Real American Tragedy.” Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 268-87. Examines Dreiser’s 1935 article “I Find the Real American Tragedy” to debunk the myth that An American Tragedy typifies a pattern Dreiser found in the Gillette case and in the several other actual murder cases he studied over the years. Argues that the “paradigm” Dreiser finds in these cases is actually his own creation and derives from his own experiences and social attitudes.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Plank, Kathryn M. “Introduction to The ‘Rake.’ ” Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 140-44. Describes the incoherent state of the manuscript of this early attempt at An American Tragedy, based on the Molineaux murder case. Argues that Dreiser could not complete the novel because he could not reconcile Molineaux’s high social status with the Clyde Griffiths-like yearnings of his protagonist.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Review of Theodore Dreiser. Vol. 2: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. American Literature 63 (Sep 1991): 555-56. 

Review of Theodore Dreiser. Vol. 2: An American Journey, 1908-1945, by Richard Lingeman. Illinois Historical Journal 84 (Winter 1991): 283. 

Richenderfer, Dolly. “Theodore Dreiser, Anti-Religionist Religionist: The Religiosity of Theodore Dreiser.” Master’s Thesis. Eastern Washington U, 1991. vi + 83 pp.

Ridley, Clifford A. “A Dreiser Novel Comes to the Stage.” The Philadelphia Inquirer 8 April 1991, pg. C3. Review of The People’s Light and Theater Company’s adaptation of Sister Carrie. 

Riggio, Thomas P. “Carrie’s Blues.” New Essays on Sister Carrie. Ed. Donald Pizer. The American Novel. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1991. 23-41. Considers Dreiser a “psychological realist” who expressed his own “depressive personality” in Carrie’s pervasive melancholia. Traces this melancholia to childhood deprivations and argues that Carrie cannot establish lasting bonds because her “primary relation to home and family is full of rebellion and shame.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Riggio, Thomas P. “Dreiser’s Final Hours.” Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 300-04. Presents extensive excerpts from the diary of Dreiser’s wife Helen Richardson to provide “the only first-hand account of Dreiser’s final hours.” See also McCoy, Esther. “The Death of Dreiser.” Grand Street 7 (Winter): 73 -85. (Reprinted: Performances and Reality: Essays from Grand Street. Ed. Ben Sonnenberg. New Brunswick Rutgers UP, pp. 27-39.)
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Riggio, Thomas P. Review of Selected Magazine Articles of Theodore Dreiser: Life and Art in the American 1890s, ed Yoshinobu Hakutani. Resources for American Literary Study 17.2 (1991): 318-21.

Rose, Lloyd. “Smashing ‘Sister Carrie.’ ” Washington Post 23 April 1991: E1. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Rubin, Merle. “To Think, To Feel, To Read.” Christian Science Monitor 1 August 1991: 16. Uses “Dreiser’s assertion that the world is divided into two kinds of people: those who think and those who feel” as a starting point for a brief analysis of two analogous schools of fiction (in that they represent a similar dichotomy) represented by Jane Austen and Emily Bronte.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Ruland, Richard, and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature. New York: Viking Penguin, 1991. 241-43, 247-48 passim.

Rusch, Frederic E. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1989.” Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 39-44.

Rusch, Frederic E. “The Dummy of The Hand of the Potter.” Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 288-99. Demonstrates that the 1918 publisher’s dummy is based on the missing unrevised galleys and thus, when compared to the holograph and revised page proofs, offers clues as to the nature and extent of Dreiser’s revisions before and after submitting the play to Boni and Liveright.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Rusch, Frederic E. Review of 1989 Penguin edition of Jennie Gerhardt, by Theodore Dreiser. Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 48-49.

Rusch, Frederic E. Review of Norton Critical Edition of Sister Carrie, 2nd edition. Dreiser Studies 22.1 (1991): 50-51.

Sauer, Thomas. “Dreiser’s Novels and Role Theory.” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991). 33-37. Review of Identität und Rolle bei Theodore Dreiser: Eine Untersuchung des Romanwerks unter Rollentheoretischen Aspekt, by Kurt Müller. 

” ‘Sister Carrie’: Breaking Walls and Traditions.” People’s Light Journal (Malvern, Pa.) 1 (1991): 1-2. Reviews production of Sister Carrie by People’s Light and Theater Company, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Smith, James F. “Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities: A Dreiser Novel for the 1980’s.” Journal of American Culture 14.3 (1991): 43-51. Finds parallels between Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities. Reprinted in Tom Wolfe. Ed. Harold Bloom Modern Critical Views. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2001. 135-49.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

“Snooty Putdowns?” Dreiser Studies 22.2 (1991): 46-50. Presents an exchange of letters between Robert H. Elias and Arun Mukherjee in which Elias defends himself against Mukherjee’s charge that he initiated a trend of “snooty putdowns” of Dreiser and Mukherjee defends her original contention.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Song, In-Yong. “Siodo doraijo ui sisto keri wa jeni gohato yongu: jayonjuui wa chowoljuui rul jungsimuro” [A Study of Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Jennie Gerhardt: In terms of naturalism and Emersonianism]. Master’s thesis, Seoul National University, Korea, 1991. In Korean. 송인영.Theodore Dreiser? Sister Carrie? Jennie Gerhardt 연구: 자연주의와 초월주의를 중심으로.석사학위논문.서울대학교, 1991. 

Stenerson, Douglas C. “Some Impressions of the Buddha: Dreiser and Sir Edwin Arnold’s ‘The Light of Asia.’ ” Canadian Review of American Studies 22.3 (1991): 387-405. Demonstrates the influence of Arnold’s poem on Dreiser’s understanding of Buddhism and suggests parallels between Buddhism and Dreiser’s own beliefs.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Stillinger Jack. Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius. New York: Oxford, 1991. 157-62 passim. Considers Sister Carrie “an epitomizing example” of “collaborative authorship” and criticizes the editors of the Pennsylvania Edition for attempting to produce what is only “a hypothetical ideal,” a purely authorial text based on the holograph.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Takeda, Miyoko. “Henry David Thoreau — Theodore Dreiser: Transcending the Natural World.” BTSJ 17 (199l): 11-15. 

Takeda, Miyoko. The Quest for the Reality of Life: Dreiser’s Spiritual and Esthetical Pilgrimage. American University Studies IV: English Language and Literature. New York: Peter Lang, 1991. Analyzes The “Genius,” The Bulwark, and The Stoic as stages in Dreiser’s search for an absolute “Reality.” Finds a movement from the aesthetic to the spiritual, with Dreiser finally arriving at a form of “Dreiserian Hinduism” that reconciles “the beauty of women and the beauty of Brahman.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Tebbel, John and Mary Ellen Zuckerman. The Magazine in America, 1741-1990 New York; Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991 101-02, 118. Provides information about Dreiser’s editorial career at the Delineator and (very briefly) Broadway magazine. Discusses improvements Dreiser made in the Delineator and quotes from a passage by one of the magazine’s contributors, Charles Hanson Towne, describing Dreiser as editor. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia of American Literature, First Edition. Ed. George Perkins, Barbara Perkins, and Phillip Leininger. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1991. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Contemporary Authors. A bio-bibliographical guide to current writers in fiction, general nonfiction, poetry, journalism, drama, motion pictures, television, and other fields, Volume 132. Detroit: Gale Research, 1991. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” Magill’s Survey of American Literature. Ed. Frank N. Magill. North Bellmore, NY: Marshall Cavendish, 1991. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Facts on File Encyclopedia of the Twentieth Century. Ed. John Drexel. New York: Facts on File, 1991. 

“Theodore Dreiser 1871-1945.” The Reader’s Companion to American History. Ed. Eric Foner and John A. Garraty. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1991. 

Theodore Dreiser Issue. Papers on Language and Literature 27.2 (1991): 139-304. Ed. James L.W. West III. A special issue devoted to Dreiser. Contains 11 previously unpublished items that are cited and annotated individually in this bibliography.

Trachtenberg, Alan. “Who Narrates? Dreiser’s Presence in Sister Carrie.” New Essays on Sister Carrie. Ed. Donald Pizer. The American Novel. 87-122. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 1991. Discovers in Sister Carrie a “hybrid narrative-discursive method” that reveals the unconscious feelings and desires of his inarticulate characters and transvalues values by establishing a perspective both inside and outside “the popular, the demotic, the vulgar.” Finds Dreiser’s treatment of consciousness strikingly similar to that of William James.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Traister, Daniel. “Dreiser and Libraries.” PACSCL News (Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries newsletter) 1.2 (1991): 1-8.

Tuerk, Richard. “The American Spectator Symposium: Was Dreiser Anti-Semitic?” Prospects 16 (1991): 367-89. Examines Dreiser’s public and private statements about Jews during the mid-1930s. Concludes that despite his denials of anti-Semitism Dreiser consistently expressed anti-Semitic attitudes that “hurt the Jews markedly at one of the worst times in history for a person of his stature to do so.”
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Updike, John. “Not Quite Adult.” New Yorker 66 (14 January 1991): 89-92. Review of Theodore Dreiser, Volume 2: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman. Reprinted Updike, John. More Matter: Essays and Criticism. New York: Knopf, 1999. 509-15.

Waldmeir, John Christian. “Individual Trinities: Time, God, and Mammon in The American Trilogy.” Diss. U of Chicago, Divinity School, 1991. iii + 245 pp. Discusses Norris’s Epic of the Wheat, Dreiser’s Trilogy of Desire, and Dos Passos’s U.S.A. trilogy.
Source: Elder, Shane, Frederic E. Rusch, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1991.” Dreiser Studies 30.2 (1999): 39-55

Wallace, Jack E. Review of Theodore Dreiser: An American Journey, 1908-1945 by Richard Lingeman (1990). American Literature 63 (1991): 555-56.

Weisner, Janice Beth. “Turn-of-the-Century City Sketches of Edwin Porter and Theodore Dreiser.” Master’s thesis, Clark U, 1991. v + 101 pp.

Winchell, Mark Royden. Neoconservative Criticism: Norman Podhoretz, Kenneth S. Lynn, and Joseph Epstein Boston: G. K. Hall, 1991. Twayne’s United States Authors Series 57-58, 64-65, 138-40. Summarizes and discusses critical views on Dreiser of the critics Kenneth S. Lynn and Joseph Epstein.