Category Archives: photographs

a few Dreiser book covers

 

 

 

Images below. For Dreiser Edition book  covers, see

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/2016/10/20/the-dreiser-edition/

 

 

 

Sister Carrie cover, first edition
Sister Carrie cover, first edition

 

 

 

The Laurel Dreiser, Jennie Gerhardt
Theodore Dreiser, “Jennie Gerhardt,” The Laurel Dreiser, Dell Publishing Company, Inc., 1963

 

 

 

Jennie Gerhardt, cover (Shocken Books)
Theodore Dreiser, Jennie Gerhardt (Shocken Books, 1982)

 

 

 

'The Financier' (Harper & Brothers 1912) - cover
Theodore Dreiser, “The Financier” – original edition (Harper and Brothers 1912)

 

 

 

'The Titan' (The Laurel Dreiser) - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, “The Titan” – paperback; The Laurel Dreiser (1959)

 

 

 

'A Traveler at Forty' - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, “A Traveler at Forty” (New York: The Century Company, 1913)

 

 

 

'The Hand of the Potter' - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, “The Hand of the Potter” (Boni and Liveright, 1918)

 

 

 

'Hey Rub-A-Dub-Dub' - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, Hey Rub-A-Dub Dub: A Book of the Mystery and Terror and Wonder of Life” (Boni & Liveright, 1920)

 

 

 

 

'A Book About Myself' - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, “A Book About Myself” (Boni and Liveright, 1922)

 

 

 

'Dawn' - cover.jpg
Theodore Dreiser, “Dawn” (Horace Liveright, Inc., 1931)

 

 

 

 

'Dreiser Looks at Russia' - cover
Theodore Dreiser, “Dreiser Looks at Russia” (Horace Liveright, 1928)

 

 

 

 

'A Gallery of Women' - cover.jpg
‘Theodore Dreiser, “A Gallery of Women,” Volume 1 (Horace Liveright, Inc., 1929)

 

 

 

 

'Tragic America' - cover
Theodore Dreiser, “Tragic America” (Horace Liveright, Inc., 1931)

 

 

 

Dreiser, 'Moods' - cover
Theodore Dreiser, “Moods: Philosophic and Emotional; Cadenced and Declaimed” (Simon and Schuster, 1935)

 

 

 

 

'The Best Short Stories of Theodore Dreiser' - cover.jpg
“The Best Short Stories of Theodore Dreiser”; introduction by James T. Farrell (Fawcett Publications, 1961)

 

 

 

 

Charles Samuels, 'Death Was the Bridegroom' - cover.jpg
Charles Samuels, “Death Was the Bridegroom” (Fawcett Publications, Inc., 1955)

 

 

 

'A Sister Carrie Portfolio' - front cover.jpg
James L. West III, “A Sister Carrie Portfolio” (University Press of Virginia, 1985) – front cover

 

 

 

 

'A Sister Carrie Portfolio' - back cover.jpg
James L. West III, “A Sister Carrie Portfolio” (University Press of Virginia, 1985) – back cover

 

 

 

'An American Tragedy' - libertto.jpg
libretto, “An American Tragedy” (2005); opera by Tobias Picker; libertto by Gene Scheer

 

 

 

'Sister Carrie' - libretto - cover
libretto, “Sister Carrie” (opera); composed by Robert Livingston Aldridge; libretto by Herschel Garfein

photos of Theodore Dreiser and relatives

 

 

Posted here (see below) are photos and portraits of Theodore Dreiser as well as numerous photos of Dreiser’s relatives and acquaintances.

There is some overlap with photos which I have already posted on this site. See

https://dreiseronlinecom.wordpress.com/?s=photographs

Notable among the persons included in these photos, besides Dreiser, are the following:

Esther A. (Schnepp) Dickerson, Theodore Dreiser’s aunt

Dreiser’s siblings Paul, Rome, Emma, Theresa, and Claire

Dreiser’s first wife Sara White Dreiser

Dreiser’s second wife Helen (Patges Richardson) Dreiser and several of her ancestors and relatives

Dreiser’s sister-in-law Mai Skelly Dreiser

Dreiser’s favorite niece Gertrude A. Hopkins

Dreiser’s niece Dr. Vera Dreiser

Harold James Dies, who was related to Helen (Patges Richardson) Dreiser and, more distantly, to Theodore Dreiser, and who served for many years as Trustee of the Dreiser Trust

Thanks are due to the following persons and institutions for permission to post photos:

Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania

Vigo County Historical Society Museum, Terre Haute, IN

the late Harold J. Dies

Gloria N. Vevante (a Dreiser family descendant)

Joann Crouch (a Dreiser family descendant)

Thomas P. Riggio

 

 

Please note: if you left click on a photo of interest, a descriptive caption for that photo will appear. If you right click on the photo, you will have the option of downloading (saving) it.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   May 2017

 

 

Continue reading photos of Theodore Dreiser and relatives

photos of the birthplaces of Theodore Dreiser and his brother Paul, Terre Haute, IN

 

 

 

 

DSCN0650.JPG
The birthplace of songwriter Paul Dresser (1857-1906); he was Theodore Dreiser’s older brother. The house has been renovated and was moved from its original location in Terre Haute to a site in the same town on the banks of the Wabash River. Photo by Roger W. Smith.

 

 

 

 

DSCN0619
Paul Dresser Birthplace, Fairbanks Park, Terre Haute, IN; photo by Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

DSCN0631
sculpture honoring songwriter Paul Dresser, created by Teresa Clark; Fairbanks Park, Terre Haute, IN; photo by Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

DSCN0625.JPG
sculpture honoring Paul Dresser; photo by Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

2.jpg
“Here is a picture of the house in Terre Haute, Indiana, where the Dreisers lived from 1872 to 1877. Its address was 203 S. 12th Street, and it was located on the southwest corner of that intersection. Some say Theodore was born here. Others say he was born at 523 S. 9th Street. Edward Dreiser was definitely born here. This house was torn down about 2011. The date of this photo is unknown.” Comment by Tamie Dehler. Photo courtesy Ms. Dehler.

 

 

 

 

3.jpg
“This was taken just a few years before the house was torn down in 2011. I lived just a few blocks from this home from 1978 to 1989. It had these cedar shingles on it at that time and was surrounded by a pretty white picket fence. I was aware that it was a Dreiser house during most of that period when I lived nearby and I always wondered why the city did not get a historical marker erected in the yard.” Comment by Tamie Dehler. Photo courtesy Ms. Dehler.

 

 

 

4.jpg
“Here is a bird’s eye view of the property, taken from a real estate site for Vigo county. This photo is, I assume, from google earth and it is dated April 2008.” Comment by Tamie Dehler. Photo courtesy of Ms. Dehler.

 

 

 

1
“This is a drawing of the home made by artist Franklin Booth, date unknown. The printed caption across the bottom of this print says ‘Franklin’s impression of my birthplace.’ I believe that caption is attributed to Theodore Dreiser.” Comment by Tamie Dehler. Photo courtesy of Ms. Dehler.

photo of Gertrude Amelia Hopkins (Theodore Dreiser’s favorite niece)

See commentary below.

Gertrude A. Hopkins (Dreiser's niece)
Gertrude Amelia Hopkins (1894-1973)

 

 

This photograph of Gertrude Amelia Hopkins (1894-1973), Theodore Dreiser’s favorite niece, is, as far as I know, unique. It is the best photo of Gertrude that I have ever seen.

I am grateful to Mrs. Gloria N. Vevante, Gertrude’s niece, for giving me this photo.

Gertrude Amelia Hopkins was the daughter of Theodore Dreiser’s sister, Emma (Dreiser) Nelson (1863-1936). Emma (Dreiser) Nelson was the real life prototype of the lead character, Carrie Meeber, in Theodore Dreiser’s first novel, Sister Carrie.

 

— Roger W. Smith

     December 2016

 

 

***************************************************

 

email to a Dreiserian from Roger W. Smith, Janrary 15, 2017

 

Attached is a gorgeous photo of Gertrude Amelia Hopkins (1894-1973), who was TD’s favorite niece.

The photo was given to me by Mrs. Gloria Vevante.

Mrs. Vevante was born Gloria Nelson. She was Gertrude’s niece. Her (Mrs. Vevante’s) father was George Nelson.

George Kates Nelson (1892-1955) was the son of Emma and Hopkins. He took the name of his stepfather, John Nelson.

George was a hotel manager in Manhattan for most of his professional life. He married a woman, Gunda Ryerson, who had emigrated when young from Norway. For many years, his family lived in Manhattan.

George had nothing to do with TD and did not seem to have been intimate with his mother, Emma, as an adult. He was apparently somewhat of a wild kid who straightened out as he matured. He knew Paul Dresser and as an adolescent would spend time with him.

His first name, George, is possibly significant, since Hurstwood’s first name is George and he has a son named George, Jr.

Gertrude alternatively used the names Gertrude Hopkins and Gertrude Nelson when she was young. She aspired to be singer when young. She was close to Emma. She ended up working for Con Edison in Westchester County. She married a coworker, Emil Dorn, and became Gertrude Hopkins Dorn. But, she found out — much later (I believe it was after Dorn’s death) — that Mr. Dorn was already married (when he married Gertrude) to a wife who had been found mentally incompetent and was confined to a hospital. Gertrude went back to being Gertrude Hopkins.

Gertrude died in Westchester in 1973.

Her letters to TD are touching.

Harold J. Dies (1914-2012), a descendant of Dreiser’s aunt who was Trustee of the Dreiser Estate (he was a cousin of Dreiser’s second wife, Helen Patges Dreiser), knew Gertrude well and played a major role in administering her estate. It is clear that he was fond of her. Tedi Dreiser Goddard and her mother, Dr. Vera Dreiser, knew Gertrude but didn’t seem to give her the time of day or think that much of her. Helen knew Gertrude and liked her. And, at an early age, at least, Gertrude used to correspond with Jug.

photo of Theodore Dreiser?

 
Above are two photographs which, after some thought, I believe are of Theodore Dreiser. As far as I know, they are unique and have not been published or posted before.

One Dreiser scholar whom I have already consulted feels certain that it is not Theodore Dreiser who is shown here. The scholar replied as follows in an email to me:

Doesn’t look like him to me. For that age, the photo is too heavy set a person, among many other things. Check out all the photos at Penn in the Dreiser collection; nothing remotely like this.

These two photos were sent me by a descendant of Dreiser’s maternal grandmother. She has a lot of precious family photos, several of which seem to be unique, including photos of Theodore Dreiser; Helen (Richardson) Dreiser and her family; and Paul Dresser.

There were four photos purportedly of Theodore Dreiser which she sent me, along with the others of the Dreiser family and those of Helen Richardson’s ancestors and relatives. Of those four photos, two (not shown above) are definitely of Theodore Dreiser.

Given that the two above photos come from a family collection, one wonders: if it’s not Theodore Dreiser, who could it be? Some consideration should also be given to the fact that the owner of the photo has always understood that it was a photo of Theodore Dreiser.

 
— Roger W. Smith

      December 2016

 


Addendum
: Regarding the “fact” that “Dreiser” doesn’t quite look like himself here, I can’t help thinking of a passport of photo of myself that was taken when I was age 25 and was making my first trip to Europe. The photographer who took my passport photo was offputting and overbearing. He insisted that I take off my glasses. In the photo, I hardly looked like myself, perhaps because I was uncomfortable. I showed the photo to a good friend of mine. He insisted it was not me. When I was traveling, I had trouble at border crossings with customs officials who thought it was someone else’s photo.

 

Addendum: For comparison purposes, I have posted below a collage of photos of Dreiser as a young man.

photos of Dreiser’s lover Marie Pergain

 

In the infamous and widely publicized “toothpick incident,” Theodore Dreiser and Marie Pergain were indicted on a charge of adultery for spending the night of Friday, November 6, 1931 together in a hotel room in Pineville, Kentucky. They had traveled to Kentucky together, Dreiser to chair hearings of the so-called Dreiser Committee into the conditions of striking mine workers.

Marie Pergain, one of Dreiser’s lovers, was the “mystery woman” involved in the scandal.

In Theodore Dresser Interviews, edited by Frederic E. Rusch and Donald Pizer (University of Illinois Press, 2004), interviews with Dreiser that were published in the Knoxville (TN) News Sentinel on November 3 and November 6, 1931 are included. The following is from the editorial commentary in the book:

Also accompanying the group was Marie Pergain (probably a fictitious name), Dreiser’s “companion.” (footnote, pg. 246)

Marie Pergain has never been identified; the name was probably adopted for the occasion. (headnote, pg. 253)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photographs

 

 

Most of the photographs of persons posted here are from the University of Pennsylvania’s Theodore Dreiser Papers through the university’s Dreiser Web Source (Rare Book and Manuscript Library Collections) and are used with the permission of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.

The unique photograph of Dreiser’s niece Gertrude Amelia Hopkins (1894-1973) was given to Roger W. Smith by Mrs. Gloria Vevante, a descendant of Dreiser’s sister Emma Dreiser Nelson.

In most cases, the photos have been cropped and dust and spots have been corrected to provide images as close as possible to the original photograph. However, these reproductions are not the originals, which are available only through the University of Pennsylvania Dreiser Web Source (Rare Book and Manuscript Library Collections).

 

 

dreiser-the-editor

 

 

 

Dreiser - prob Penn 432-45