Dreiser bibliography, 2008

 

 

David-Fox, Michael. ” ‘Russia and the West” in a Soviet Key: The Genesis of Theodore Dreiser’s “Russian diary’ ” Sources First!: Religion, Politics and Culture in Pre-Modern & Modern Russia [Papers Presented At] a Workshop at Yale University Organized by the Students of Paul Bushkovitch in Honor of his Sixtieth Birthday, Friday, April 4 & Saturday, April 5, 2008, held at Luce Hall, Yale University. New Haven: Paul Bushkovitch, 2008. 

Erdheim, Cara Elana. “Is There a Place for Ecology in An American Tragedy? Wealth, Water, and the Dreiserian Struggle for Survival.” Studies in American Naturalism 3.1 (2008) 3-21. 

Firner, Nadja. Theodore Dreiser’s “Dawn” — The Formation of a Mind: An Autobiographical Representation. Saarbrücken, Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Mülller, 2008. 

Johnson, William Bruce. Miracles and Sacrilege: Roberto Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood. U of Toronto P, 2008. 

Jones, Gavin. American Hungers: The Problem of Poverty in U.S. Literature, 1840-1945. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton UP, 2008. Passim. 

Kelly, William P. Review of Theodore Dreiser’s A Picture and a Criticism of Life: New Letters, Volume 1, ed. Donald Pizer and The “Genius”, ed. Clare Virginia Eby. Times Literary Supplement 30 May 2008: 11.

Loranger, Carol. S. Review of American Naturalism and the Jews: Garland, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather, by Donald Pizer. Studies in American Naturalism 3.1 (2008) 79-83. 

Mao, Douglas. Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860-1960. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2008. Passim. “[R]ecovers the lost intellectual, social, and literary history of the belief that the beauty – or ugliness – of the environment in which one is raised influences or even determines one’s fate. Weaving together readings in literature, psychology, biology, philosophy, education, child-rearing advice, and interior design, he shows how this idea abetted a dramatic rise in attention to environment in many discourses and in many practices affecting the lives of the young between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth. Through original and detailed analyses of Wilde, Walter Pater, James Joyce, Theodore Dreiser, Rebecca West, and W. H. Auden, Mao shows that English-language writing of this period was informed in crucial but previously unrecognized ways by the possibility that beautiful environments might produce better people. He also reveals how these writers shared concerns about environment, evolution, determinism, freedom, and beauty with scientists and social theorists such as Herbert Spencer, Hermann von Helmholtz, Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, and W. H. R. Rivers.” (book jacket) 

Margolies, Edward. New York and the Literary Imagination: The City in Twentieth Century Fiction and Drama. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2008. Part Two studies variations and themes in works of Stephen Crane, Tom Wolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Theodore Dreiser.

Mulligan, Roark. “Dreiser’s Murder Ballad.” Studies in American Naturalism 3.1 (2008) 22-41. 

Newlin, Keith. Hamlin Garland: A Life. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2008. 344-45.

Pizer, Donald. American Naturalism and the Jews: Garland, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. Bloomington: U of Illinois P, 2008. 

Rollyson, Carl. Biography: A User’s Guide. Ivan R. Dee, 2008. 173. 

Sasa, Ghada. The Femme Fatale in American Literature. Naturalism. Amherst, NY: Cambria, 2008.

Steinmeyer, Jim. Charles Fort: The Man Who Invented the Supernatural. London: William Heinemann; New York; Penguin, 2008. Passim. 

Strong, Marilee. Erased: Missing Women, Murdered Wives. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Passim. Discusses American Tragedy murder case and Dreiser’s interest in various similar cases as the basis for a novel. 

Tomlins, Christopher and Michael Grossberg. The Cambridge History of Law in America. Volume 2. 3 vols. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 2008.

Travis, Jennifer. “Injury’s Accountant: Theodore Dreiser and the Railroad.” Studies in American Naturalism 3.1 (2008) 42-59. 

Underwood, Doug. “Literary realism and the fictions of the industrialized press, 1850-1915: Mark Twain to Theodore Dreiser.” Journalism and the Novel: Truth and Fiction, 1700-2000. Cambridge, England; New York: Cambridge UP, 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s