Dreiser bibliography, 2000

 

Amano, Kyoko. “Alger’s Shadows: Re-Considering the American Dream.” Ph.D. dissertation, State U of New York at Binghamton, 2001. 263 pp. DAI 62 (2002): 4162A. Examines the influence of Horatio Alger, Jr.’s novels (and the myth that arises from them) on the novels of Howells, Dreiser, James Weldon Johnson, Jane Smiley, and Gish Jen.

Armstrong, Heather Stewart. “City Consciousness: A Comparison of Cather’s The Song of the Lark and Dreiser’s Sister Carrie.” Willa Cather’s New York: New Essays on Cather in the City. Ed. Merrill Maguire Skaggs. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP; London: Associated UP, 2000. 257-65.

Ban, Guangyu. “Yong Bi Gole Chu de Tuhua – Theodore Dreiser Nigger Jeff Shangxi.” (A True Sketch – Theodore Dreiser’s Nigger Jeff) Journal of Qin Zhou Teachers College 2 (2000). 班光语,「用笔勾勒出的图画–Theodore Dreiser Nigger Jeff赏析」,钦州师范高等专科学校学报, 2000年第2期。 

Barabash, Christina Jean. “A Girl’s Guide to Cultural Capital: The American Gold Digger, 1900-1950.” Master’s thesis, U of Alberta, Canada, 2000. 133 pp. MAI 40 (2002): 41. Traces the emergence of the gold digger as a recognizable figure in twentieth-century American culture. Chapter 2 discusses the prototypical gold digger as presented in Sister Carrie.

Barcus, James E. More Light on Dreiser’s Chester Gillette/Clyde Griffiths Family. English Language Notes 38.1 (2000): 68-73.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “Dreiser’s Diaristic Mode.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 26-42.

Bardeleben, Renate von. “From Travel Guide to Autobiography: Recovering the Original of A Traveler at Forty. Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 177-86.

Berebitsky, Julie. Like Our Very Own: Adoption and the Changing Culture of Motherhood, 1851-1950. Lawrence: UP of Kansas, 2000. 52-61. Discusses Dreiser’s involvement in the Delineator’s “Child-Rescue Campaign.” 

Blaise, Clark. Time Lord: Sir Sandford Fleming and the Creation of Standard Time. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2000; New York: Pantheon, 2001. Published in Canada as Time Lord: The Remarkable Canadian Who Missed His Train, and Changed the World. Toronto: Knopf Canada, 2000. 232-37. Uses railroad travel as described in Sister Carrie as basis for a brief discussion of implied themes related to speed, force, female vs. male sexuality, and their implications for traditional morality at the turn of the nineteenth century.

“Blocked: The Novelist’s Experience in Hollywood.” Santa Monica, CA: American Movie Classics, 2000. Documentary cable television program. Covers Dreiser’s suit against Paramount Studios over changes made in the 1931 film version of An American Tragedy.

Bovey, Seth. Review of Reading the Symptom: Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, and the Dynamics of Capitalism, by Mohamed Zayani. American Literary Realism 33:1 (2000): 87-88. 

Bramen, Carrie Tirado. “Dreiser and the Spectacle of Extremes.” The Uses of Variety: Modern Americanism and the Quest for National Distinctiveness. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2000. 182-87; see also pp. 160, 174. Traces historical development of concept of diversity as foundational to concepts of modern Americanism, beginning in the Gilded Age. Examines Dreiser’s writings about New York City within the context of the aesthetic of an “urban picturesque,” which “promised to turn the urban realities of class disparity and ethnic heterogeneity into customary sights and even potentially pleasant aspects of the modern experience.”

Brennan, Stephen C. “Introduction, Neda Westlake Memorial Issue.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 2-4.

Brennan, Stephen C. “Sadomasochistic Fantasy in ‘The Second Choice.’ ” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 43-62.

Brennan, Stephen C. “This Sex Which Is One: Language and the Masculine Self in Jennie Gerhardt.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 138-57.

Brezina, Jennifer Costello. “Public Women, Private Acts: Gender and Theater in Turn-of-the-Century American Novels.” Separate Spheres No More: Gender Convergence in American Literature, 1830-1930. Ed. Monika M. Elbert. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2000. 225-42. Explores how the use of theater in both setting and metaphor reflects the cultural impact that changing roles for women were having on society as reflected in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Paul Laurence Dunbar’s The Sport of the Gods, Frank Norris’s The Pit, and Ellen Glasgow’s Phases of an Inferior Planet.

Butler, Robert. “Urban Frontiers, Neighborhoods, and Traps: The City in Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Farrell’s Studs Lonigan, and Wright’s Native Son.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 274-90.

Clasby, Nancy Tenfelde. “Naturalism and the Orphan Archetype: Dreiser, London, and Crane.” New Jerusalem: Myth, Literature, and the Sacred. Scranton, PA: U of Scranton P, 2000. 105-23. Discusses treatment of the orphan archetype in Dreiser’s story “The Second Choice,” pp. 109-11.

Cohen, Josh. Review of An American Tragedy: Perils of the Self Seeking “Success,” by Paul A. Orlov. Journal of American Studies 34.2 (2000): 337-38. 

Connolly, Thomas F. “Happy Endings in American Tragedies.” pp. 152-61. In: Pyzik, Teresa and Pawel Jedrzejko, eds. Reflections on Ethical Values in Post Modern American Literature. Prace Naukowe Uniwersytetu Slaskiego w Katowicach (PNUSK). Katowice, Poland: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Slaskiego, 2000.

Cox, J. Randolph. The Dime Novel Companion: A Source Book. Westwood, CT: Greenwood, 2000. 84-85, 91. States that part of Dreiser’s apprenticeship at Street and Smith may have involved editing or writing stories for ‘”Diamond Dick, Jr.: The Boys’ Best Weekly,” a Street and Smith publication. 

Cuoco, Lorin, and William H. Gass, eds. Literary St. Louis: A Guide. St. Louis: Missouri Historical Society P, 2000. 88-95, 250-51. Citation pp. 88-95 consist of section entitled “Theodore Dreiser: April 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945”; pg. 250-251 specifies addresses Dreiser worked at and was associated with while in St. Louis.

Doenecke, Justus D. Storm on the Horizon: The Challenge to American Intervention, 1939-1941. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000. 190, 191, 194, 195. Contains scattered references to Dreiser’s anti-interventionist and anti-British views, mostly drawing upon Dreiser’s America Is Worth Saving as a source and also on a 1940 Dreiser speech to American Peace Mobilization (cited in Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide, Second Ed.; Ed. Pizer, Dowell, and Rusch; Boston: G. K. Hall, 1991 as A40-5 and C40-11).

Donovan, Nancy M. “Representing Grace Brown: The Working-Class Woman in ‘American Tragedy’ Murder Narratives.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 3-21.

Dudley, Andrew “Adaptation.” Film Adaptation. Ed. James Naremore. Rutgers Depth of Film Series. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2000, pp. 28-37.

Eaton, Mark A. “Moving Pictures and Spectacular Criminality in An American Tragedy and Native Son.” Prospects: An Annual of American Cultural Studies 27 (2000): 399-426.

Elder, Shane, and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1992.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 63-66.

Elder, Shane and Stephen C. Brennan. “A Dreiser Checklist, 1993-1997.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 39-57.

Fredrickson, Kathy. “Working Out to Work Through: Dreiser in Muldoon’s Body Shop of Shame.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 115-37.

Gair, Sheila. “Sister Carrie Theodore Dreiser.” MC2: Journal of Mensa Canada Communications 33.4 (2000): 9. A retrospective review.

Gammel, Irene, and Henry Srebrnik. “Re/Visiting Russia with Theodore Dreiser.” Resources for American Literary Study 26.1 (2000): 110-15. Review-essay of Dreiser’s Russian Diary (1996).

Gelb, Arthur, and Barbara Gelb. O’Neill: Life with Monte Cristo. New York and London: Applause, 2000. 428, 508-9, 561-62, 625. Contains information placing Dreiser in the same Greenwich Village circles in which O’Neil moved and among mutual acquaintances such as Kirah Markham. Briefly discusses the theory that Dreiser may have been a model for the character of Hickey in O’Neill’s play “The Iceman Cometh.”

Gerber, Philip. “Jolly Mrs. Yerkes Is Home from Abroad: Dreiser and the Celebrity Culture.” Hakutani, Yoshinobu, ed. Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings, pp. 79-103.

Gerber, Philip. “Stopping By at Neda’s.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 5-12. Contains reminiscences of Neda M. Westlake, curator of the University of Pennsylvania Library’s Dreiser collection.

Glenn, Susan A. Female Spectacle: The Theatrical Roots of Modern Feminism. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2000. 81, 127-8. Briefly comments on Carrie Meeber in Sister Carrie as representing the personification of “the female as a symbol of inauthenticity.” States (using as source Elizabeth Gurley Flynn’s autobiography) that, in the aftermath of Socialist orator Elizabeth Gurley Flynn’s arrest in 1906, Dreiser published an article in Broadway Magazine describing her ‘eloquence, her youth and loveliness’ and calling her ‘An East Side Joan of Arc.’ “ 

Gogol, Miriam. “Interlocking, Intermeshing Fantasies: Dreiser and Dearest Wilding.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 187-202.

H. L. Mencken: A Documentary Volume. Ed. Richard J. Schrader. Dictionary of Literary Biography 222. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2000. 213-20.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu, ed. Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Newark, DE: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000. Contains 16 articles that are cited individually in this bibliography.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “Sister Carrie: Novel and Romance.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 23-38.

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “Wright, Dreiser, and Spatial Narrative.” Hakutani, Yoshinobu, ed. Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings, pp. 248-73.  

Hakutani, Yoshinobu. “Wright, Dreiser, and Spatial Narrative.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 248-73.

Hapke, Laura. “Men Strike, Women Sew: Gendered Labor Worlds in Dreiser’s Social Protest Art.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 104-14.

Harmon, Charles. “Cuteness and Capitalism in Sister Carrie.” American Literary Realism 32.2 (2000): 125-39.

Hartsock, John C. A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form. Amherst: U of Massachusetts P, 2000: 63-65, 76-79, 220 Traces mid- and late-twentieth century journalistic techniques and styles back to the journalism of the late nineteenth century. Discusses how Dreiser’s journalistic training influenced his early writings (notably Sister Carrie) and other writers of fiction who began as journalists. 

Hilfer, Anthony Channell. “The Small Town in American Realism.” American Realism. The Greenhaven Press Companion to Literary Movements and Genres. Ed. Christopher Smith. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven, 2000. 171-72.

Hogue, Beverly Jean. “From Primeval Forest to Machine in the Garden: Narratives of Nature in the Old Northwest.” Ph.D. dissertation, Bowling Green State U, 2000. 214 pp. DAI 61 (2001): 4774A. Examines the portrayal of the Midwestern landscape in literature during the years 1890-1930. Chapter V contains a section entitled “Hidden Gardens: Dreiser’s Urban Wilderness,” focusing on Jennie Gerhardt.

Hussman, Lawrence E. “Expansive and Unnameable Desire in American Fiction: From ‘Naturalism’ to Postmodernism.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 214-33.

Jacobson, Matthew Frye. Barbarian Virtues: The United States Encounters Foreign Peoples at Home and Abroad, 1876-1917. New York: Hill and Wang, 2000. 132-133. Briefly comments on the Dreiser character Jennie Gerhardt as representing a certain type of immigrant character seen in fiction of the time, in which the simplicity and goodness of characters like Jennie are opposed to “wearying and stultifying elements of modern life.” 

Jiang, Daochao “Cultural Assumption Difficult to Transcend–A Review of 20th Century Studies of Theodore Dreiser in China and USA,” Journal of Shenzhen University 5 (2000): 87-94.

Karaganis, Joseph. “Naturalism’s Nation: Toward An American Tragedy.” American Literature 72.1 (2000): 153-80. Abstract: “Discusses the nature of the different publics Theodore Dreiser invokes and the function of the trial in An American Tragedy.”

Lehan, Richard, Donald Pizer, and James L. W. West III. “Reminiscences.” Dreiser Studies 31.1 (2000): 13-16. Reminiscences of Neda M. Westlake, curator of the University of Pennsylvania Library’s Dreiser collection.

Lewis, Charles R. “Desire and Indifference in Sister Carrie: Neoclassical Economic Anticipations.” A Coincidence of Wants: The Novel and Neoclassical Economics. Literary Criticism and Cultural Theory: The Interaction of Text and Society. New York: Garland, 2000. 23-25, 127-44. Includes reprint of Lewis, Charles R. “Desire and Indifference in Sister Carrie: Neoclassical Economic Anticipations.” Dreiser Studies 29.1&2 (1998): 18–33.

Lewis, Charles R. Review of Dreiser and Veblen, Saboteurs of the Status Quo, by Clare Virginia Eby Modern Fiction Studies 46.2 (summer 2000): 519-21 

Li, Wenxing. “Dreiser’s Change of Philosophical Thinking Viewed from Sister Carrie and Jennle Gerhardt.” (The Evolution of Dreiser’s Philosophical Views as Seen in Sister Carrie and Jennie Gerhardt) Journal of Xuchang Teachers’ College (Social Sciences Edition) 19.3 (2000): 85-88. 李文星,「从《嘉莉妹妹》和《珍妮姑娘》看德莱塞哲学思想的变迁」,许昌师专学报,2000年第19卷第3期,頁85-88。

Lingeman, Richard. Introduction. An American Tragedy. Signer Classic (2000). vii-xv.

Lingeman, Richard. Introduction. Sister Carrie. Signet Classic (2000). ix-xviii.

Maltby, Richard. ” ‘To Prevent the Prevalent Type of Book’: Censorship and Adaptation in Hollywood, 1924-1934.” Film Adaptation. Ed. James Naremore. Rutgers Depth of Film Series. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2000. 79-105.

Merish, Lori. Engendering Naturalism: Narrative Form and Commodity Spectacle in U.S. Naturalist Fiction. Duke UP, 2000.

Moddelmog, William E. “Theodore Dreiser’s Progressive Nostalgia.” Reconstituting Authority: American Fiction in the Province of the Law, 1880-1920. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 2000. 190-219. Discusses The Financier and The Titan in terms of their narrative modes and their complicated treatments (at once critical and celebratory) of the business world. See also Moddelmog, “Reconstituting Authority: American Fiction in the Province of the Law, 1880-1920” (1997).

Moyer, Marsha S. “Dreiser, Sister Carrie, and Mrs. Doubleday: Gender and Social Change at the Turn of the Century.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 39-55.

Müller, Kurt. “Dreiser, Theodore [Herman].” Metzler Lexikon amerikanischer Autoren. Hg. Bernd Engler und Kurt Müller. Stuttgart: Metzler, 2000. 196-200. 

Mulligan, Roark. “Running with Diana: Dreiser’s Hunt of American Endogamy.” American Literary Realism 32.2 (2000): 140-51.

Murayama, Kiyohiko. ” ‘But a Single Point in a Long Tragedy’: Sister Carrie’s Equivocal Style.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 65-78.

Oakes, Donald T. Afterword. The House in the Woods (1904), by Arthur Henry. Hensonville, NY: Black Dome, 2000. 155-96. Provides a detailed biographical sketch of Dreiser’s friend Arthur Henry. Includes information about Henry’s first two wives, Maude (Wood) Henry and Anna (Mallon) Henry, that is pertinent to Dreiser’s biography as well as Henry’s. Discusses at length the circumstances of and vicissitudes in the Dreiser-Henry relationship.

Pan, Qingling. “Theodore Dreiser: Sister Carrie – In Conmemoration of the First Centennial Anniversary of the Publication of Sister Carrie.” (In Commemoration of the Centennial of the Publication of Sister Carrie) Journal of Shanghai University (Social Sciences Edition) 7.4 (2000): 29-35. In Chinese. 潘庆舲,「悠悠百年话嘉丽──纪念《嘉丽妹妹》问世一百周年」,上海大学学报(社会科学版),2000年第7卷第4期,頁29-35。 

Parisier, Nicole Heidi. “Novel Work: Theater and Journalism in the Writing of Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton and Willa Cather.” Ph.D. dissertation, Yale U, 2000. i + 178 pp. DAI 61 (2001): 4054A. Focus on Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Wharton’s The House of Mirth, and Cather’s The Song of the Lark.

Perry, Imani. “Dusky Justice: Race in United States Law and Literature, 1878-1914.” Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard U, 2000. 239 pp. DAI 61 (2000): 1843A. Examines ways in which American authors opposed Jim Crow and other racially stigmatizing laws. Authors discussed include Charles Chesnutt, Albion Tourgee, Mark Twain, Alice Dunbar Nelson, Dreiser, and Kate Chopin.

Phiankankon, Kitikul. [An Analysis of the Male Protagonist’s Struggle for Existence in Theodore Dreiser‘s An American Tragedy.] Thesis. Srinakharinwirot University, Thailand, 2000. เคราะห์การต่อสู้เพื่อชีวิตของตัวละครเอกชายในเรื่อง An American tragedy ของ Theodore Dreiser by กิติกูล เพียรการกล., เสาวนี อินทรภักดี. ที่ปรึกษา, สมทรง เจริญกุล ที่ปรึกษา, มหาวิทยาลัยศรีนครินทรวิโรฒ. วิชาเอกภาษาอังกฤษ.[6~ 2543]. 

Pizer, Donald. “American Naturalism in Its ‘Perfected’ State: The Age of Innocence and An American Tragedy.” Edith Wharton: The Age of Innocence: Complete Text with Introduction, Historical Contexts, Critical Essays. Ed. Carol J. Singley. New Riverside Editions. Boston: Houghton Mifflin; 2000. 434-41. Reprints essay first published in Pizer, Donald, The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism (1993).

Pizer, Donald. Literary Masters: Theodore Dreiser. Gale Study Guides to Great Literature. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, 2000.

Pizer, Donald. Review of The Collected Plays of Theodore Dreiser, ed. Keith Newlin and Frederic E. Rusch. Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 58-59.

Prebel, Julie Elizabeth. “Domestic Mobility in the American Post-Frontier, 1890-1900.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of Washington, 2000. 232 pp. DAI 61.3 (2000): 989A. Examines how themes of domesticity intersect with tropes of mobility in late nineteenth-century literature and culture. “Domestic Mobility, Ideology, and the New Woman in Burnham’s Sweet Clover: A Romance of the White City and Dreiser’s Sister Carrie” (thesis chapter).

Preston, Claire. Edith Wharton’s Social Register. London: Macmillan; New York: St. Martin’s, 2000. 94, 128-29 passim. Makes some comparisons to Dreiser’s “Trilogy of Desire” in discussing the money-novel as exemplified by Wharton’s The Custom of the Country.

Reesman, Jeanne Campbell. “Fiction: 1900 to the 1930s.” American Literary Scholarship: An Annual 1998. Ed. David J. Nordloh. Durham. NC: Duke UP, 2000: 257-85. (Dreiser pp. 265-68.)  

Review of Reading the Symptom: Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, and the Dynamics of Capitalism. American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism and Bibliography, March 2000 

Review of Twelve Men (A98.3). Forum for Modern Language Studies 36.4 (2000): 453.

Riggio, T P. Review of The Collected Plays of Theodore Dreiser, ed. Keith Newlin and Frederic E. Rusch. Choice 38.4 (Dec 2000): 705. 

Riggio, Thomas P. “Dreiser, Fitzgerald, and the Question of Influence.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 234-37.

Riggio, Thomas P. “Dreiser’s Song of Innocence and Experience: The Ur-Text of Jennie Gerhardt.” Dreiser Studies 31.2 (2000): 22-38.

Schleifer, Ronald. “Analogy beyond Intelligence: Dreiser, Mailer, and the Nature of Intertextuality.” Analogical Thinking: Post-Enlightenment Understanding in Language, Collaboration, and Interpretation. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2000. 155-78. Provides “an intertextual reading” of Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Norman Mailer’s The Executioner’s Song “comprehended in relation to semiotic and social readings — corporate apprehensions — of narrative.” Revision of the author’s “American Violence: Dreiser, Mailer, and the Nature of Intertextuality.” In Intertextuality and Contemporary American Fiction. Ed. Patrick O’Donnell and Robert Con Davis Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1989.

Sehlinger, Peter J., and Holman Hamilton. Spokesman for Democracy: Claude G. Bowers, 1878-1958. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society P, 2000. 39, 101, 146-47 passim. Provides a few details about the relationship between Bowers and Dreiser. See also Bowers, Claude. “Memories of Theodore Dreiser.” In My Life: The Memoirs of Claude Bowers. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1962.

Sister Carrie in the 21st Century. Participants: Joseph Epstein, James L. W. West III. West Lafayette, IN: C-SPAN Archives, 2000. VHS tape; 1 videocassette (69 min.). Part of a three-day symposium on the 100th anniversary of the publication of Sister Carrie. Recorded 9 Nov. 2000 in Philadelphia, PA.

Smith, Larry. “The American Working Class Short Story.” The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-Century American Short Story. Ed. Blanche H. Gelfant and Lawrence Graver. New York: Columbia UP, 2000. 84. “Although Dreiser’s stories may seem to modern readers plodding and dense with detail, they are well-crafted portraits of American life, focused more on theme than the easy charm of popular fiction, and they take the reader inside the characters’ experiences and points of view.”

Sorel, Edward. “Fifty-fifty.” New Yorker 25 Dec. 2000-1 Jan. 2001: 110-11. Recounts incident (described by Bennett Cerf in At Random: The Reminiscences of Bennett Cerf [1977]) in which Dreiser threw coffee in publisher Horace Liveright’s face in a dispute over the sale of screen rights to An American Tragedy.

Sow, Rouguiyatou. “Espace urbain et crise des moeurs dans Jagua Nana by Cyprian Ekwensi et An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser.” Dissertation (D.E.A.), l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal, 2000. 

Springer, John Parris. Hollywood Fictions: The Dream Factory in American Popular Literature. Oklahoma Project for Discourse and Theory. Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 2000. 137-38. Comments on Dreiser’s criticisms of the film industry, particularly the sexual exploitation of aspiring female, actresses in a series of articles by Dreiser entitled “Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners” that appeared in Shadowland in 1921-22. States that “Dreiser’s claims remain largely unsupported by corroborating details.”

St. Jean, Shawn. “Dreiser and Literary Paganism: A Reading of the Trilogy of Desire.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 203-13.

Stansell, Christine. American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century. New York: Henry Holt, 2000. Passim. Provides a few mentions of Dreiser and tidbits of biographical detail. Useful for information about the Greenwich Village circles in which he moved.

“Theodore (Herman Albert) Dreiser 1871-1945.” Reference Guide to American Literature. Fourth Edition. Ed. Thomas Riggs. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. 

“Theodore Dreiser.” Notable American Novelists, Vol. 1. Ed. Carl Rollyson. Magill’s Choice. Pasadena, CA: Salem P, 2000. 308-18. 

Tian, Fengrong. “From Nobody to Somebody – An Analysis of Behavioral Changes of the Protagonist in Sister Carrie.” Master’s thesis, Hebei University, China, 2003. 田凤荣,「从无名到显赫──试析《嘉莉妹妹》中的女主人公的行为变化」[硕士论文],河北保定:河北大学,2003年。 

Trilling, Lionel. “Reality in America.” The Moral Obligation To Be Intelligent: Selected Essays, Ed. Leon Wieseltier. New York: Farrar, 2000. 71-86. Reprint of article first published in Trilling’s The Liberal Imagination (Viking, 1950).

Ultan, Lloyd and Barbara Unger. Bronx Accent: A Literary and Pictorial History of the Borough New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2000. 52-56. Recounts (mostly quoting from Dreiser’s own writings) Dreiser’s period of residence in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx and his use of his Bronx experiences as material for The “Genius.”  

Weinmann, Christopher John. “Dreiser’s ‘Lost Decade’: Five Unpublished Stories.” Ph.D. dissertation, Pennsylvania State U, 2000. 269 pp. DAI 61 (2001): 3177A. Examines, and provides text of, five unpublished short stories that were most likely written by Dreiser in the period 1904-1909. Also focuses on Dreiser’s work as an editor of popular magazines at the time, arguing that he did not sacrifice his principles for financial security, but rather worked both publicly and privately to pursue cultural and social questions important to him.

West, James L. W. III. “Alcohol and Drinking in Sister Carrie.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp. 56-64.

Westlake, Neda M. Preface to The House in the Woods, by Arthur Henry. Heronsville, NY, 2000: Black Dome Press, ix-xi. Discusses Henry’s relationship with Dreiser and alludes to Dreiser’s retaliatory (and unflattering) portrait of Henry as a thinly disguised character in his story “Rona Murtha” in A Gallery of Women.

Whaley, Annemarie Koning. “Obscuring the Home: Textual Editing and Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt.” Theodore Dreiser and American Culture: New Readings. Ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani. Newark: U of Delaware P; London: Associated U Presses, 2000, pp 161-76.

Whaley, Annemarie Koning. “Silencing Dreiser: Textual Editing and Theodore Dreiser’s Jennie Gerhardt.” Ph.D. dissertation, Louisiana State U, 2000. 261 pp. DAI 61 (2001): 2724A.

Woolley, Lisa. American Voices of the Chicago Renaissance. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois UP, 2000. 5, 10, 14-15, 25-26, 69-70, 110. Explores connections between literary and spoken language in Midwestern speech and writing with several illustrative examples from Dreiser’s works. 

Yang, Lili and Bai Limei. “The Suggestive Effects of Symbolism – Writing Skills in Sister Carrie” [original title]. Journal of Lanzhou University (Social Sciences Edition) 28.S1 (2000): 60-63. In English. Yang, Lili、Bai Limei,「The Suggestive Effects of Symbolism – Writing Skills in Sister Carrie」,兰州大学学报(社会科学版),2000年 第28卷S1期,頁60-63。(英文) 

Zimmerman, David Andrew. “Frenzied Fictions: The Writing of Panic in the American Marketplace, 1873-1913.” Ph.D. dissertation, U of California, Berkeley, 2000. 333 pp. DAI 62 (2001): 178A. Chapter 2, “The Fictional Uses of Financial Panic,” examines panic fiction of Robert Barr, Edward Lefèvre, Frederic Isham, Upton Sinclair, and Dreiser (The Financier).

 

 

 

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